Events

Tunisia’s Islamist-Led Democracy Founders

The failure of Tunisia's ruling Islamic Ennahda movement to convince secular parties and civil society groups that it is truly committed to the separation of religion and state underlies the current political crisis there. Ennahda's moderate leadership has made repeated compromises on religious issues to meet secularist demands for a new constitution. But it has lost their trust by showing too much deference to its own militant Islamic wing and fundamentalist Salafis outside the movement.

Change May Be Greater Than Anyone Expected

By choosing the candidate least identified with the recent policies of the ruling system, a majority sent a strong message to the Supreme Leader and the regime, writes Haleh Esfandiari, in the New York Time's "Room for Debate" section.

The Future of U.S.-Israeli Relations

Jane Harman and Aaron David Miller comment on U.S.-Israeli relations in light of the election.

Syria’s Peace Initiative

In this interview on CTV News, Distinguished Scholar Robin Wright discusses the nuanced message in Annan’s latest speech and the great stake that Syria’s allies Russia and Iran have in the outcome of the conflict. Would Assad’s ouster bring peace to Syria or would violence erupt among Syria’s various ethnic groups in a bid for power?

With This Redo, Do It Right

The next year may be more turbulent than the last one. Handled well, it could also be more productive, writes Robin Wright in The New York Times.

Arab Perspectives on Iran’s Role in a Changing Middle East

The complexity of Arab attitudes toward Iran before and after the start of the Arab uprisings is reflected not only in the gap of perception between the Arab people and Arab governments, but also in important differences on Iran across those governments. Even among Arab governments most threatened by Iran and most inclined to see it weakened, their sense of threat and how to address it differs substantially from Israel’s sense of threat.

Iran Curtails Female Education

“Iran is reverting to the failed policies of the past,” says Middle East Program Director Haleh Esfandiari in a Q&A on the decision of 36 Iranian universities to limit access to or altogether bar women from certain academic fields.

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