Events

You Thought the Brotherhood Was Bad?

In one of the many bizarre twists of Egypt's recent political convulsion, hardline Salafi parties look poised to replace the Muslim Brotherhood as the most important Islamist players in the political process. It's a situation ripe with irony, writes Senior Scholar Marina Ottaway.

J. Christopher Stevens, 1960-2012

"He represented the very best of American diplomacy. He knew the streets, not just the elites. He had an infectious enthusiasm about the extraordinary history playing out across the Middle East, which he witnessed up close," said Distinguished Scholar Robin Wright on her friend of 25 years, Ambassador Christopher Stevens.

Exile of Assad Family A Key First Step in Political Transition

With a Tuesday ceasefire date in doubt and allegations continuing to swirl of military atrocities, it is becoming clearer that the first step of Syria’s political transition should be the removal of President Bashar al-Assad and his family, Wilson Center Director Jane Harman tells MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell.

Engaging With Iran on the Nuclear Issue

President Obama had given himself until the end of 2009 to decide if Iran is serious about negotiating. Now, "the United States seems headed for a put-up or shut-up moment in its threat to impose sanctions on Iran," writes Wilson Center Public Policy Scholar Michael Adler in this Point of View editorial.

Whatever Happens Next, Iraq Won't Be the Same

"The days of Iraq as a unitary country that can be ruled by a powerful government in Baghdad are over," writes Marina Ottaway.

Obama Will Bomb Syria

"Obama will act militarily in Syria, but deliberately. Whatever its misgivings, the U.S. military will execute whatever attack the president authorizes – maybe missile strikes against units that have used chemical weapons, or against other military infrastructure. And if he explains his reasoning clearly and transparently, he’ll have Congress and the public behind him," writes Aaron David Miller in Politico.

The Future of Syria

"This is not just a Syria problem, this is a world problem. I think we have reached the tipping point. This opposition or what is good about it…has got to get more support from the United States and it has to be known that we are helping,” said Jane Harman on MSNBC's Morning Joe.

The Uncertain Fate of U.S.-Egyptian Relations

Ottaway, who has just visited Cairo, writes about the future U.S.-Egyptian relationship in light of the current political drift between the two countries and Egypt’s ongoing economic crisis. Egypt’s current attempt to secure a $4.8 billion IMF loan requiring potential subsidy cuts to gasoline and cooking oil serve to complicate matters as ensuing price rises could trigger riots and provoke Egyptians to blame the United States.

Fostering the Next Generation

The following is the text of the keynote address by Public Policy Scholar Moushira Khattab at the Centre for Development and Population Activities conference co-sponsored by the Middle East Program, “Fostering the Next Generation: Evolving Models of Women’s Leadership in the Middle East” held on April 18, 2012.

Iraq: Tackling Corruption and Sectarianism is More Critical than the Outcome of Elections

Iraqis are heading to the polls at the end of April. More important than the results of these elections are fundamental issues confronting the country such as the economy's utter reliance on oil, the prevalence of corruption in every sector, and the deepening sectarianism that is impacting political and economic decisions.

Pages

Upcoming Events

Experts & Staff