Events

Women after the Arab Awakening (Winter 2012)

In this publication, based on papers presented at a conference on October 2, 2012 at the Wilson Center, the younger, up-and-coming generation in the MENA region describe the current situation on the ground for women and the strategies they can use to organize themselves and move forward in the post-revolutionary phase.

Getting the Story in Iraq---At What Cost?

In the chaotic, precarious landscape that is Iraq, can journalists do their job? 2004 Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and current Wilson Center Public Policy Scholar Anthony Shadid contends that Iraq's future and journalists' ability to cover the nation are linked and will depend on the situation on the ground. In this article, Shadid relates what he has learned over the past year covering Iraq, both on the ground and here in Washington, DC. He also reveals what he considers the most far-reaching, if least noticed aspect of the war in Iraq.

The Stalled Arab Spring

Unless the Arabs figure out a way to share power toward some common purpose, the prospects for anything resembling democratic and accountable polities will be slim to none, writes Distinguished Scholar Aaron David Miller.

Little Reason for Fear

America's Arab allies are unnecessarily alarmed by the limited understanding reached over Iran's nuclear program, writes Middle East Program Director Haleh Esfandiari. They imagine that in no time at all, the U.S. and Iran will be fast friends, Iran will emerge as the hegemon in the Persian Gulf, and Washington will sacrifice Arab security interests in Iran's favor. Here is why they are wrong.
Egypt's first Islamist president Mohamed Mursi attends during his meeting with Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu at the presidential palace in Cairo July 2, 2012. Egypt will approach the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and other financial institutions to help get its economy back on track once Mursi appoints a government, one of his financial advisers told Reuters.

Egypt's Fundamental Crisis of Legitimacy

Wilson Center Senior Scholar Marina Ottaway discussed the legitimacy of the outcome of Egypt's recent elections and the validity of the country's new constitution in a June 6, 2013 National Interest article.

Iran Under President Ahmadinejad

The June 26 meeting presented a reversal of the overarching conclusion of last year's conference that the election of President Ahmadinejad would not significantly affect Iran's path of reform. This underestimation was addressed with a discussion of the recent developments and trends in Iran. The first panel featured a discussion of the national political and socio-economic situation as well as a presentation on the power of the local democratic establishment in Iran. Speakers addressed the real versus perceived command capacity of President Ahmadinejad, the fruition or failure of his socio-economic policies, and the seeming reversal of local democratic reform under his administration. The second panel focused on Iran's foreign policy drivers, options, and goals. Speakers touched on Iran's historical and strategic ambitions in the Caspian region as well as its relations with Europe and the United States. They discussed Iran's attempt to secure itself economically and the strategic determinants steering the country's actions and overtures.

The Injustice in Egypt’s Courts

“Showing utter disregard for basic rights is no way for Cairo to prove its claim of transitioning back to democratic rule—or convincing the outside world that Egypt is a safe place to travel or to invest,” writes Robin Wright.

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Experts & Staff