Events

Contested Memories and Reconciliation Challenges: Japan and the Asia Pacific on the 70th Anniversary of the End of the Second World War

March 18, 2015 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Seventy years after the end of World War II, unfinished postwar reconciliation continue to haunt relations between Asian nations. Japan finds itself at the heart of the regional politics, and its reflections, attitude and remarks toward this part of history still arouse a strong public sentiment particularly in China and Korea.

The Struggle for Order: Hegemony, Hierarchy and Transition in Post-Cold War East Asia

February 23, 2015 // 2:00pm3:30pm
It is often understood that contemporary politics in the region is marked by balance of power activity that precedes an inevitable power transition when China’s power “catches up” with that of the United States. In The Struggle for Order: Hegemony, Hierarchy and Transition in Post-Cold War East Asia, however, Australian National University’s Evelyn Goh argues that U.S. hegemony has been consolidated in East Asia in spite of China’s rise, because of the crucial support of other regional states which prefer a U.S.-led order.

Modern Times in North Korea: Scenes from its Founding Years, 1945-1950

December 15, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
North Korea is often portrayed in mainstream media as a backward place, a Stalinist relic without a history worth knowing. But during its founding years (1945-1950), North Korea experienced a radical social revolution when everyday life became the primary site of political struggle, including quite deliberately a feminist agenda. With historical comparisons to revolutions in the early 20th century, Suzy Kim introduces her recent book through rarely seen archival photos, situating the North Korean revolution within the broader history of modernity.
North Korean Market
Webcast

2014 IFES-WWICS Washington Forum on Korea

December 05, 2014 // 12:00pm5:00pm
The Woodrow Wilson Center has partnered with the Institute for Far Eastern Studies (IFES), Kyungnam University, to convene the IFES-WWICS Washington Forum on Korea, an annual gathering designed to give a broader historical perspective to policy discussions on Korea in the United States.

New Approaches to Understanding and Engaging North Korea

November 21, 2014 // 3:00pm4:00pm
North Korea is often portrayed as a “hermit kingdom,” its politics inscrutable, and its doors closed to outside influence. However, this dynamic of isolation has begun to erode, thanks in part to scholars and practitioners who have carved out new ways to study North Korea and engage with its people. At the event, young professionals in the field will discuss the various ways in which they have carved out new terrain for working on North Korean issues through archival research, economic training, student exchanges, and leadership studies.

U.S.-Korea Relations in Public Diplomacy

November 18, 2014 // 10:00am11:30am
Public opinion is playing an ever-increasing role in forging diplomatic ties, including relations between the United States and Korea. Public diplomacy between and within the two countries, and the role the media plays in shaping foreign policy will be assessed in a joint conference with Ewha Womans University and the Korean Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

U.S.-Korea Relations in Public Diplomacy

November 17, 2014 // 11:00am5:00pm
Public opinion is playing an ever-increasing role in forging diplomatic ties, including relations between the United States and Korea. Public diplomacy between and within the two countries, and the role the media plays in shaping foreign policy will be assessed in a joint conference with Ewha Womans University and the Korean Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
Webcast

Deal or No Deal: How To Negotiate Successful Nuclear Agreements

September 17, 2014 // 2:30pm4:30pm
When are nuclear agreements successfully negotiated? A combination of factors—technical, domestic political, and strategic—enabled Washington and New Delhi to conclude a civil nuclear accord in 2008. The US-India case offers useful lessons for negotiations in progress with Iran, and for possible future nuclear accommodation with Pakistan and North Korea.

North Korean War Orphans in Transnational Educational Exchange

August 27, 2014 // 2:00pm3:00pm
More than 100,000 children from both North and South Korea were orphaned during the Korean War. In 1953, the North Korean government dispatched 1,200 orphans to the People’s Republic of Poland to be educated at a boarding school transformed into an orphanage. The orphans were repatriated after six years, at the insistence of the North Korean government, as tensions between Pyongyang and its communist allies began to emerge. NKIDP Intern Intaek Hong examines the complicated process of how the orphans defined their identity based on their experience of interacting with their Polish teachers—who became like foster parents—and deploying their subjectivity in the process.
Webcast

Assessing Threats Facing the U.S.-Korea Alliance

June 18, 2014 // 12:10pm6:00pm
The dynamism of Asian markets, China’s rise, and Japan’s quest to become a normal state, play key roles in determining the future of the US-ROK alliance. At the same time, U.S. perception of China’s growing influence differs from that of Korea’s. Similarly, Washington does not see eye-to-eye with Seoul over changes in Japan’s policies. While the bilateral alliance remains strongest in dealing with North Korea, the two allies also have different views on dealing with this challenge.

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Experts & Staff

  • Christian F. Ostermann // Director, History and Public Policy Program; Global Europe; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
  • James Person // Deputy Director, History and Public Policy Program; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
  • Charles Kraus // Program Associate
  • Roy O. Kim // Program Assistant
  • Jean H. Lee // Public Policy Fellow