Events

Research Updates on Brazil's Nuclear Relations with South Africa, Argentina

NPIHP has just published two new Research Updates in cooperation with the Fundacao Getulio Vargas (FGV) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Today's releases document Brazil's earliest efforts to cooperate with Argentina on nuclear issues, as well as South Africa's attempt in the late 1970s to work with Brazil on nuclear technology development.

Call for Papers: European Summer School on Cold War History

Fourth Annual European Summer School on Cold War History at the Università di Trento, 5-8 September 2012

Between Aid and Restriction: Changing Soviet Policies toward China’s Nuclear Weapons Program: 1954-1960

Based on newly-available archival material from Chinese sources, NPIHP Working Paper #2 explores the relationship between Soviet Union and China during the 1950s and 1960s as the latter sought to establish their atomic industry and develop a nuclear weapon with Soviet scientific and technological assistance.
NPIHP-IDSA Delegation at National Archives of India

Indian Government Announces Major Release of Foreign Policy Documents at NPIHP-IDSA Workshop in New Delhi

India's Ministry of External Affairs (MEA) has just announced the impending release of 220,000 newly declassified files on India's foreign policy history. Speaking at an NPIHP-Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses (IDSA) workshop on "The Early Years of Nuclear Cooperation and Non-Proliferation" in New Delhi, MEA Special Secretary Pinak Chakravarty explained that "It is understandable that the historical evolution of our nuclear policy and development of strategic thinking in this area is a matter of considerable academic interest ... We welcome academic inquiry and analysis on this subject."

NPIHP Partner Anna-Mart van Wyk published in LSE IDEAS

Deals, Denials and Declassification: Israeli-South African Nuclear Collaboration

Nuclear Weapons in International Politics: It's Getting Personal

The role that nuclear weapons play in international politics and security is evolving. For wealthy, militarily powerful countries, nuclear weapons are playing a diminishing role in security planning. Conversely, some countries that lack advanced military capabilities may be coming to see nuclear weapons as increasingly important for their security. The differences between these two groups are reinforced by the fact that, over the past decade, two dictators who ended their nuclear programs have lost their regimes and their lives. As a result, authoritarian leaders may now have an increasingly personal interest in holding on to their nuclear ambitions. U.S. interests can be advanced by minimizing the association that has developed over the past decade between ending nuclear weapons programs, ending regimes, and ending authoritarian leaders’ lives.

When Stalin Met Mao: Digital Archive Featured in "Foreign Policy"

Sergey Radchenko writes in Foreign Policy on Mao and Stalin’s first awkward meeting and what it tells us about Xi Jinping’s confident trip this week to see Vladimir Putin.

Two New Research Updates on Brazil-Iraq and Brazil-Argentina Nuclear Relations

NPIHP and the Fundacao Getulio Vargas are pleased to announce the publication of two new Research Updates on Brazil's nuclear cooperation with Iraq and Argentina.

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Experts & Staff

  • Christian F. Ostermann // Director, History and Public Policy Program; Global Europe; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
  • Leopoldo Nuti // Co-Director, Nuclear Proliferation International History Project; Public Policy Scholar
  • Evan Pikulski // Program Assistant