Program

Events

Tools of the Trade: Models for Trade Policy Analysis

Edited by Christine McDaniel, Ken Reinert, and Kent Hughes, Tools of the Trade: Models for Trade Policy Analysis was published in January 2008 based on the analysis of experts and policymakers at a conference held on January 22nd and 23rd, 2004, by the Woodrow Wilson Center and the U.S. Department of Commerce.The goal of the "Empirical Trade Analysis Conference: Strengthening Analytical Capabilities to Support Trade Negotiations" was to assess the strengths and weaknesses of economic models and their ability to inform trade policy questions.An event held on January 15th, 2008, "Today's Trade Policy Landscape", launched the report and hosted U.S. Trade Representative Susan C. Schwab.

Negotiations for a Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement

The only major current trade negotiation that the U.S. is engaged in at this time is the negotiation for a Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement with eight other nations in Asia and the Americas.

"The New Old World: The Politics of Aging" **POSTPONED**

"The New Old World: The Politics of Aging" is postponed until October 2003.

Negotiations for a Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement

The TPP is a major attempt to update the rules governing international trade to meet new challenges. In this paper, Wilson Center Senior Scholar William Krist puts the TPP negotiations in a historic context, assesses the current state of the negotiations, examines a number of key issues involved and explores the implication of new members joining the negotiations.

The Impact of Trade Liberalization on Poverty

On April 15, 2005, the Wilson Center, in conjunction with the U.S. Agency for International Development, hosted four panels of policymakers, academics, and experts to examine the links between trade liberalization and poverty reduction. This report provides a nuanced exploration of the relationship between free trade and the world's poorest peoples.

How to Save American Jobs and Global Leadership in the Aerospace Industry

Over the past 15 years, the United States has lost 700,000 aerospace jobs, market share, and new commercial plane orders to overseas competitors. In this policy address, Senator Patty Murray of Washington state argues that the United States must respond to this threat before we lose our global standing in an industry created and traditionally led by Americans. In her remarks, she described the progress that's been made in the past two months, her work with U.S. officials, and the steps she's taking in the United States Senate to retain American strength in the second century of flight.

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