Science and Technology Innovation Program

Events

The Future of Health Care and the Independent Vote

Much like the general public, players of Budget Hero are split in their support for the Affordable Care Act, though two years of data from the game suggests many independents are choosing not to repeal the landmark health law and would even support including a government-run option.

The Wisdom of Gamers

January 2007 - How many players does it take to balance the budget? David Rejeski wants you to put on your game face.

Seven Myths and Realities about Do-It-Yourself Biology

This report challenges seven widely held beliefs about DIYbio practitioners, particularly that anonymous scientists are cooking up deadly epidemics in their basements. In fact, the survey finds most lab work being done in the community is benign and that the vast majority of those surveyed perform their experiments in group workspaces with other enthusiasts. The report also includes six policy recommendations based on the survey results.

Commons Lab

Rapidly evolving information and communication technologies, including social media and mobile phones, coupled with new methodologies like crowdsourcing, have placed the collective “wisdom of the crowd” and power of mass collaboration into the hands of average citizens and organizations. STIP’s Commons Lab seeks to advance research and independent policy analysis of these emerging technologies, with an emphasis on their social, legal, and ethical implications. The initiative does not advocate for or against specific technological platforms, rather works to ensure that these technologies are developed and used in a way that maximizes benefits while reducing risks and unintended consequences. Our work often focuses on novel governance options at the “edges” where the crowd and social media operate –between formal and informal organizations and proprietary and open-source models of data ownership and access. For more information, please see: http://www.CommonsLab.wilsoncenter.org.

PEN 10 - Where Does the Nano Go? End-of-Life Regulation of Nanotechnologies

View All materials and products eventually come to the end of their useful life, and those made with nanotechnology are no different. This means that engineered nanomaterials will ultimately enter the waste stream and find their way into landfills or incinerators—and eventually into the air, soil and water. As a result, it is important to consider how various forms of nanomaterials will be disposed of and treated at the end of their use, and how the regulatory system will treat such materials at the various stages of their lifecycle.

The Potential and Challenge of Gene Drives

A cross-disciplinary team is calling for public discussion about a potential new way to solve longstanding global ecological problems by using an emerging technology called “gene drives.”

Improving The Environment With Advanced ID Tags

RFID technology could improve traffic flow, encourage recycling, and inform consumers if implemented responsibly.

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Experts & Staff