Science and Technology Innovation Program

Events

PEN 10 - Where Does the Nano Go? End-of-Life Regulation of Nanotechnologies

View All materials and products eventually come to the end of their useful life, and those made with nanotechnology are no different. This means that engineered nanomaterials will ultimately enter the waste stream and find their way into landfills or incinerators—and eventually into the air, soil and water. As a result, it is important to consider how various forms of nanomaterials will be disposed of and treated at the end of their use, and how the regulatory system will treat such materials at the various stages of their lifecycle.

Improving The Environment With Advanced ID Tags

RFID technology could improve traffic flow, encourage recycling, and inform consumers if implemented responsibly.

The Science Beat: Has Quality of Reporting Improved or Declined?

In a world increasingly driven by scientific and technological breakthroughs, are we getting the information we need to understand the rapid changes and choices we face? And as print space dedicated to science decreases, have online sources emerged to fill the void?

New Life, Old Bottles

In New Life, Old Bottles: Regulating First-Generation Products of Synthetic Biology, Michael Rodemeyer examines the benefits and drawbacks of using the existing U.S. regulatory framework for biotechnology to cover the new products and processes enabled by synthetic biology. The safety of early applications of synthetic biology may be adequately addressed by the existing regulatory framework for biotechnology, especially in contained laboratories and manufacturing facilities, according to the report. But further advances in this emerging field are likely to create significant challenges for U.S. government oversight.

Nanotechnology and Public Attitudes

A new study released by the Wilson Center's Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies, a project created in partnership with The Pew Charitable Trusts, reveals that while Americans welcome new potential life-saving and -enhancing applications promised by nanotechnology, they voice concern over its potential long-term human health and environmental effects and the ability of government and the private sectors to manage such risks.

Workshop Brings Together Scientists to Discuss Engineered Nanomaterials and Human Health Hazards

On April 6-7, 2006, the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies, Rice University, the International Council On Nanotechnology (ICON) and Environmental Defense co-sponsored a workshop on engineered nanomaterials and human health hazards.

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