Science and Technology Innovation Program

Events

Important First Step to Test Nanomaterials' Toxicity

The International Life Sciences Institute will release a new report that for the first time gives scientists the elements of a framework for assessing the potential human health effects from exposure to engineered nanomaterials.

PEN 4 - Nanotechnology in Agriculture and Food Production: Anticipated Applications

View Thanks to nanotechnology, tomorrow’s food will be designed by shaping molecules and atoms.

PEN 6 - NanoFrontiers: Visions for the Future of Nanotechnology (Report)

View Controlling the properties and behavior of matter at the smallest scale—in effect, “domesticating atoms”—can help to overcome some of the world’s biggest challenges, concludes a new report on how diverse experts view the future of nanotechnology. This publication highlights the findings of a Washington, DC meeting organized by the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, and the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies

Globalization: A Documentary

We would like to thank members of the Project on America and the Global Economy, the Latin American Project, the Division of International Studies, the Comparative Urban Studies Project, the Environmental Change and Security Project, the Canada Institute, Outreach and Communications, and Scholar Selection Services who dedicated time and energy to creating the Globalization Series. The film was edited and produced by Liz Freedman of the Foresight & Governance Project.

Where Will the Science of Today Lead Us Tomorrow?

Nanotechnology promises to affect virtually all aspects of our daily lives, from consumer products and food to medicine and energy, and yet the majority of Americans still know little to nothing about it. As part of its mission to improve public awareness, the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies uses new media to convey complex technological applications and implications to a public still puzzled about basic science.

Genomics and the Future of Medicine and Society

Dr. Francis Collins, Director of the National Human Genome Research Institute at the National Institutes of HealthThe Human Genome Project (HGP) began in 1990 as an effort by researchers from around the world to map and sequence the human genome—the totality of human DNA—as well as the genomes of important experimental organisms, like yeast, the nematode worm, and mouse. In 2000, the collaborators in the HGP announced the completion of a draft revealing the sequence of 90 percent of human DNA. In a Director's Forum, Dr. Francis Collins discussed the initial analysis of the human genome sequence, its medical benefits as well as its social, legal, and ethical implications.

Responding to Liability: Evaluating and Reducing Tort Liability for Digital Volunteers

Major emergencies and crises can overwhelm local resources. In the last several years, self-organized digital volunteers have begun leveraging the power of social media and “crowd-mapping” for collaborative crisis response. Rather than mobilizing a physical response, these digital volunteer groups have responded virtually by creating software applications, monitoring social networks, aggregating data, and creating “crowdsourced” maps to assist both survivors and the formal response community. These virtual responses can subject digital volunteers to tort liability. This report evaluates the precise contours of potential liability for digital volunteers.

The Promise and Potential of Citizen Science

“Citizen Science” projects include a wide range of activities from the simple to the sophisticated. In this Context interview, Erin Heaney discusses a case in Western New York that proves the practice can have a significant impact on the health and well-being of communities.

Pages

Upcoming Events

The National Plan for Civil Earth Observations

September 04, 2014 // 1:00pm2:30pm

Complexity and the Art of Public Policy

September 12, 2014 // 12:30pm2:00pm

Experts & Staff