Science and Technology Innovation Program

Events

PEN 18 - Oversight of Next Generation Nanotechnology

View Existing health and safety agencies are unable to cope with the risk assessment, standard setting and oversight challenges of advancing nanotechnology. The nation needs a new agency to address current forms of pollution and to deal with the health and environmental impacts of the technically complex products promised by rapid 21st century scientific advances. In this landmark report, Oversight of Next Generation Nanotechnology, J. Clarence (Terry) Davies calls for a new Department of Environmental and Consumer Protection to oversee product regulation, pollution control and monitoring, and technology assessment.

Woodrow Wilson Center and IBM Explore the Future of Computing

Managing just one computer can tax the average person's technical capabilities. How do we thrive in a world where we might be connected to thousands of computational devices, which are connected to each other? This seminar and discussion explored the emerging world of autonomic computing. The video of the meeting is available here.

Nanotechnology Doesn't Make News

Nanotechnology is hailed by some scientists, venture capitalists, and government officials as the next industrial revolution. But two media experts at a program sponsored by the Wilson Center's Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies report that, compared to other areas of science, nanotechnology newspaper coverage is scarce.

Healthy Democracy

We discuss an Oregon initiative to improve the quantity and quality of civic participation in that state.

In Search of a Budget Hero

With the threat of another partisan standoff over the federal budget looming, Senator Mark Udall (D-Colorado) hosted a group of constituents to play a round of Budget Hero. The “serious game” is a fantastically effective tool that should be further deployed to the public, says Udall.

New Report on Nanotechnology in Agriculture and Food

Thanks to nanotechnology, tomorrow's food will be designed by shaping molecules and atoms. Dr. Jennifer Kuzma and Peter VerHage estimate possible areas and timeframes for future nanotechnology-based food and agriculture applications.

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