Science and Technology Innovation Program

Events

Futures Research

Ted Gordon is a futurist and management consultant who founded The Futures Group in 1971.This 25-minute video captures key points from a presentation at the Woodrow Wilson Center that occurred on October 16, 2001. The talk focused on the evolution of futures research, its promises, and its relation to planning and policymaking. Among a varied and impressive background, Mr. Gordon currently serves as Senior Research Fellow for the Millennium Project of the American Council of the Unites Nations University. The Millennium Project, which he first proposed in 1988, is a global activity that links futurists, scholars, and political and corporate decision makers in a structured inquiry into global issues and solutions.

The Power of Hackathons: A Roadmap for Sustainable Open Innovation

Hackathons offer an opportunity to achieve innovation-oriented goals with limited resources, but require careful planning and organizational commitment to sustain engagement over the long term. This brief provides an overview of hackathons and offers strategies from previous successful events.

“Budget Hero” Added to BrainPOP’s Free Resource for Top Educational Games

“Budget Hero,” the computer game, designed to help people of all ages understand the Federal budget and the underlying issues that shape it, is now offered on the free resource GameUp™, BrainPOP’s collection of cross-curricular game titles from leading publishers.

Nanotechnology: The Power of Small

Products incorporating nanotechnology have become a global, multi-billion dollar industry yet much of the public knows little about nano's potential impact on the environment, human health, and privacy. A three-part tv series, "Nanotechnology: The Power of Small," airing in April, will explore these issues.

Environmental Issues of the Next Century

Geoff Dabelko, Director of the Environmental Change and Security Project at the Woodrow Wilson CenterIf environmental problems remain a major challenge in the 21st century, poverty and affluence will be critical factors in shaping that challenge. During the 20th century, rich nations developed a particular pattern of pollution and environmental degradation -- which has yet to be adequately addressed. Likewise, poor nations began despoiling the environment and squandering resources in ways that were distinctive to them. (First broadcast July 19-25, 1999)

The Nagoya Protocol and Synthetic Biology Research: A Look at the Potential Impacts

This report assesses how implementation of the Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefit Sharing (NP) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) may affect U.S. researchers working in the area of synthetic biology. It also analyzes selected provisions in CBD-related national legislation predating the NP that may be relevant for such researchers.

PEN 16 - Nanotechnology: The Social and Ethical Issues

View Recent action in Congress to reauthorize the U.S. federal nanotechnology research program offers the chance to address the social and ethical issues concerning the emerging scientific field, experts say. “It is crucial to address social and ethical issues now as we consider both the substantial potential risks of nanotechnology and its possible significant contributions to our well-being and environmental sustainability,” says Ronald Sandler, Northeastern University philosophy professor and author of a new report funded by the Project and the National Science Foundation. The report emphasizes ways in which such topics intersect with governmental functions and responsibilities, including science and technology policy, as well as research funding, regulation and work on public engagement.

Center Explores Nanotechnology and Energy

The application of nano-scale technologies is beginning to dramatically impact both how we produce and conserve energy. How far can these technologies take us on the road towards energy independence? In this seminar, a panel of industry experts explored a wide range of technologies, ranging from photovoltaics to lighting and clean coal technology.

The Next Industrial Revolution

The next industrial revolution will fundamentally change the way we make things, and where. Government needs to create policy frameworks that support the transition to a new manufacturing paradigm and we also need to have a public conversation about what this world should look like and what policies are needed to make sure that both society and the planet will benefit.

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Upcoming Events

Webcast

Data Journalism and Policymaking: A Changing Landscape

July 30, 2014 // 10:00am12:00pm

Experts & Staff