Science and Technology Innovation Program

Events

Beyond the Laboratory and Far Away: Immediate and Future Challenges in Governing the Bio-economy

Today’s bio-economy, where info-, nano-, and biotechnology converge, has the potential to yield great advances in all sectors, including medicine and energy, by using advanced modes of manufacturing at an atomic scale while achieving reproducible results. This creative convergence sounds exciting, but scientific advances and technological innovation do not come without some risks. Policymakers need to adopt a critical perspective on governance approaches regarding the bio-economy, keeping in mind how it affects our intricate sociotechnical system, our regulatory cultures, and the evolving relationships between researchers, funders, industry and the public.

Nanotechnology Now Used in Nearly 500 Everyday Products

The number of consumer products using nanotechnology has more than doubled in the 14 months since the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies launched the world's first online inventory of manufacturer-identified nanotech goods in March 2006.

PEN 14 - The Consumer Products Safety Commission and Nanotechnology

View Official Report Release Page The inability of the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to carry out its mandate with respect to simple, low-tech products such as children’s jewelry and toy trains bodes poorly for its ability to oversee the safety of complex, high-tech products made using nanotechnology, according to E. Marla Felcher.

Is 3-D Printing a Game Changer?

David Rejeski, Director of the Wilson Center’s Science and Technology Innovation Program, discusses the potential of 3-D printing and digital fabrication.

Trends in Synthetic Biology Research Funding in the United States and Europe

A 2010 analysis by the Synthetic Biology Project found that the U.S. government spent around $430 million on research related to synthetic biology since 2005, with the Department of Energy funding a majority of the research. By comparison, the analysis indicated that the European Union and three individual European countries – the Netherlands, United Kingdom, and Germany – had spent approximately $160 million during that same period. Approximately 4 percent of the U.S. funding and 2 percent of the European funding was being spent to explore ethical, legal, and social implications of synthetic biology, but no projects focused on risk assessment.

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