Science and Technology Innovation Program

Events

My Bright Idea: Jane Harman on Using Games to Fix Government

Jane Harman writes about the potential of serious games – like the Wilson Center’s own Budget Hero – to engage citizens in public policy and even fix our broken Congress in Bloomberg's "My Bright Idea" column.

Nanotechnology Can Be Child's Play

Most educators promote "hands-on" science learning. But how do children experience activities-based learning about nanotechnology—a world of atoms and molecules that's too small to see with the naked eye and that requires sophisticated electron or scanning probe microscopes?

New Terrorism and New Media

This report examines how Al-Qaeda, its affiliates and other terrorist organizations have moved their online presence to YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and other social media outlets, posing challenges to counter-terrorism agencies.

New Visions in Citizen Science

Published by the Commons Lab, "New Visions in Citizen Science" showcases seventeen case studies that offer a mosaic view of federally-sponsored citizen science and open innovation projects, from in-the-field data collection to online games for collective problem-solving. This report offers a sampling of different models that support public contribution, potential challenges, and positive impacts that projects can have on scientific literacy, research, management, and public policy.

PEN 8 - Green Nanotechnology: It’s Easier Than You Think (Report)

View The ability to eliminate waste and toxins from production processes early on, to create more efficient and flexible solar panels, and to remove contaminants from water is becoming an exciting reality with nanotechnology. This “green nanotechnology” involves designing nanoproducts for the environment and with the environment in mind. Last spring, stakeholders came together to participate in a series of dialogues on the topic, hosted by the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies. This report highlights the research breakthroughs, industry perspectives, and policy options discussed at those meetings.

Congressional Testimony - 5/4/06

David Rejeski Testifies in front of the Senate Commerce Committee.

Beyond the Laboratory and Far Away: Immediate and Future Challenges in Governing the Bio-economy

Today’s bio-economy, where info-, nano-, and biotechnology converge, has the potential to yield great advances in all sectors, including medicine and energy, by using advanced modes of manufacturing at an atomic scale while achieving reproducible results. This creative convergence sounds exciting, but scientific advances and technological innovation do not come without some risks. Policymakers need to adopt a critical perspective on governance approaches regarding the bio-economy, keeping in mind how it affects our intricate sociotechnical system, our regulatory cultures, and the evolving relationships between researchers, funders, industry and the public.

PEN 11 - Room at the Bottom?

View State and local governments often have adopted trailblazing initiatives to address environmental, health and safety concerns in advance or in lieu of federal action. With nanotechnology, an emerging field of science with unknown risks, this practice is continuing, a landmark study has found. “In the absence of action at the federal level, local and state governments may begin to explore their options for oversight of nanotechnology,” says author Suellen Keiner. The report discusses possible options for state and local governments to follow that would allow for oversight of the potential negative impacts of nanotechnology – including local air, waste and water regulations, as well as labeling and worker safety requirements.

The Social Life of Information

John Seely Brown, Chief Scientist, XEROX and co-author (with Paul Duguid) of the book The Social Life of Information.Many believe that computerization is adversely affecting the place of books, libraries, universities and conversation. John Seely Brown thinks that this is a misperception. He argues that the flourishing of the computer age will call for increased reliance on the social formation of knowledge. In this interview, John Seely Brown discusses his recent book (co-authored with Paul Duguid), The Social Life of Information, and talks about the evolution of information technology in our complex and often unpredictable social world.

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Upcoming Events

Complexity and the Art of Public Policy

September 12, 2014 // 12:30pm2:00pm

Experts & Staff