Science and Technology Innovation Program

Events

Importance of Synthetic Biology in the 21st Century

The Synthetic Biology Project is being launched to identify gaps in our knowledge of the potential risks of the field, explore public perceptions towards it, and examine governance options that will both ensure public safety and facilitate innovation.

Predicting the Future of Science and Technology: Wanna Bet?

Over the next few months, the Science and Technology Innovation Program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars will be running an experiment in the use of an online prediction market to explore the future of science and technology.

Wilson Center Launches New Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies

The Wilson Center's new Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies will study the potential health and environmental implications of nanotechnology products. Developments from this cutting-edge science will increasingly affect our everyday lives, from medicines to consumer products to new energy sources.

PEN 3 - Nanotechnology: A Research Strategy for Addressing Risk

View This report by Dr. Andrew Maynard proposes a comprehensive framework for systematically exploring possible risks.

The Nagoya Protocol and Synthetic Biology Research: A Look at the Potential Impacts

This report assesses how implementation of the Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefit Sharing (NP) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) may affect U.S. researchers working in the area of synthetic biology. It also analyzes selected provisions in CBD-related national legislation predating the NP that may be relevant for such researchers.

Public Engagement in an Age of Complexity

The goal of the Public Engagement in an Age of Complexity project is to take a deeper dive into the issue of complex systems and use the findings to improve methods of communication and public engagement.

Business, Government Use Video Games to Explore Serious Issues

January 2007 - Sheila Riley reports in Investor's Business Daily on how govenment agencies like the EPA are using serious games to teach important concepts.

What We Know and What We Might Know About the Brain

Dr. Jordan Grafman, Chief of the Cognitive Neuroscience Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health. Dr. Grafman talks about how discoveries in cognitive neuroscience may change our understanding of memory, addiction, and attention deficit disorder. He discusses how and why we need to better prepare for the ethical and social implications of these advances. Learn more about Dr. Grafman's work at: http://intra.ninds.nih.gov/Lab.asp?Org_ID=83 The ideas presented here do not represent the official view of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the Deparment of Health and Human Services, or the U.S. Government.

Pages

Upcoming Events

Complexity and the Art of Public Policy

September 12, 2014 // 12:30pm2:00pm

Experts & Staff