Science and Technology Innovation Program

Events

Reinventing Technology Assessment for the 21st Century

A new report defines the criteria for a new technology assessment function in the United States, emphasizing the need to incorporate citizen-participation methods to complement expert analysis.

U.S. EPA Expert Joins Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies

Internationally-recognized environmental scientist Barbara Karn has joined the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies. Dr. Karn will focus on innovative ways to apply the principles of "green" chemistry and "green" engineering to nanotechnology.

Political Perceptions: Budget Cutting, the Videogame

Wall Street Journal Economics reporter and Wilson Center alum David Wessel writes a post about the serious game Budget Hero for the WSJ’s Washington Wire blog, featuring comments from Dave Rejeski and links to the game and the weekly Data Reports.

Project Director David Rejeski Addresses Senate Committee on Commercialization of Nanotech

WASHINGTON – Today, at hearings convened by the U.S. Senate project director David Rejeski testified that the country's "ability to reap the long-term benefits of nanotechnology—in areas from medicine to energy and food production—will depend heavily on how we manage the introduction of the first generation of nanotechnology products."

Nanotech Safety Needs Specific Government Risk Research Strategy and Funding

"Prioritizing nanotechnology risk research isn't rocket science," says Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies chief scientist Andrew Maynard.

Sharing data while protecting privacy in citizen science

Article published in the Policy forum of Interactions Magazine. Citizen science projects must protect the privacy of volunteers by informing them about potential threats and implementing safeguards. Privacy laws, policies, and standards exist to guide developers of citizen science applications toward best practices.

Washington Goes to Sand Hill Road

January 2008 - F&G releases a new research brief looking into federal efforts at venture capital.

Which World? Scenarios for the 21st Century

Allen Hammond, World Resources InstituteThe seeds have already been sown for the flowers that will blossom in the 21st century. If they are the flowers of wrath, they will spring from the poverty and inequity that are so evident as the 20th century ends. If they bloom into a garden of rare, harmonious beauty, it will be because we humans were wise enough to seek greater interconnectedness among the world's societies, rich and poor alike. In this interview, Allen Hammond discusses his book Which World? Scenarios for the 21st Century. The book probes the consequences of present social, economic, and environmental trends to construct three possible worlds that could await us in the 21st century: Market World, Fortress World, and Transformed World.

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Upcoming Events

Complexity and the Art of Public Policy

September 12, 2014 // 12:30pm2:00pm

Experts & Staff