About the Maternal Health Initiative

Life and health are the most basic human rights, yet disparities between and within countries continue to grow. No single solution or institution can address the variety of health concerns the world faces. By leveraging, building on, and coordinating the Wilson Center’s strong regional and cross-cutting programming, the Maternal Health Initiative (MHI) promotes dialogue and understanding among practitioners, scholars, community leaders, and policymakers. more

The Latest from the Maternal Health Initiative

Webcast

World Population Day 2014: Youth Engagement and the Sustainable Development Agenda

Event //
July 10, 2014 // 3:00pm5:00pm
This year’s World Population Day focuses on youth engagement and the future of the global development agenda as the Millennium Development Goals expire next year. Young people are the key to building a sustainable future because the choices they make now will reverberate for decades to come. more
Webcast

Delivering Quality Antenatal Care in Low Resource Settings: Examining Innovative Models and Planning For Scale Up

Event //
June 30, 2014 // 3:00pm5:00pm
The World Health Organization recommends that all pregnant women attend a minimum of four antenatal care visits with a trained health care provider and that a number of key services be provided at those visits. However, there are large inequities in access, adherence, and quality of antenatal care between and within regions and countries. more
Webcast

Pakistan’s Polio Crisis: The Deeper Story

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June 10, 2014 // 11:00am12:15pm
The world is witnessing a resurgence of the polio virus, and Pakistani is at its epicenter. This year, Pakistan has already reported about 60 cases—far more than any other country. Most observers blame Pakistan’s worsening polio problem on rising militancy. Yet according to Samia Altaf, there is a deeper story beyond this popular narrative. more

Jane Harman on Reproductive Health

Article //
Apr 29, 2014
"American opponents of women's rights used to argue that "biology is destiny" and that therefore women's role in the world had to be limited to bearing and raising children. Women like my mother and me who wanted more than that felt like outsiders in the 1950s and 1960s –and in too many parts of the world this is still true," writes Jane Harman. more

Experts & Staff

  • Roger-Mark De Souza // Director of Population, Environmental Security, and Resilience, Wilson Center
  • Sandeep Bathala // Senior Program Associate, Environmental Change and Security Program, Maternal Health Initiative
  • Katrina Braxton // Program Assistant, Maternal Health Initiative
  • Schuyler Null // Writer/Editor, Environmental Change and Security Program, Maternal Health Initiative