Staff Articles

Issues in this Series

Changes in U.S. Policy on Africa in the New Administration: What will it mean for AFRICOM?

Steve McDonald
U.S. policy is dictated by global political and economic realities as well as domestic U.S. policy priorities. Not only is President Obama faced with the stark reality of an America perceived by many to have lost its moral compass in an increasingly multi-polar world where American power and resource capacities are dwindling and its leadership role being challenged, but the priorities of policy and resource allocation must remain for the short and near-terms on the domestic economic crisis, the two unpopular wars he has inherited and traditional national interest priorities. In the realm of foreign affairs, this means that Europe, Russia, the Middle East, Japan and China will continue to be the highest priorities and, as the developing world intersects with those policy priorities, it will be mostly in the form of India, Brazil, and, perhaps, South Africa.

Democracy and Peace-building: Re-thinking the Conventional Wisdom

Howard Wolpe and Steve McDonald
Author Posting. (c) 'The Round Table Ltd', 2008.This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of 'The Round Table Ltd' for personal use, not for redistribution.The definitive version was published in The Round Table, Volume 97 Issue 394, February 2008.doi:10.1080/00358530701844742 (http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00358530701844742)

Empowering Local Peacebuilders: Strategies for Effective Engagement of Local Actors in Peace Operations

Various Authors
This USIP publication features, "Getting the Right People in the Room: The Burundi Leadership Training Program" by Howard Wolpe and Africa Program Director, Steve McDonald.

Africa’s Long Spring

Steve McDonald
Long before it came to the Arab world, spring swept through sub-Saharan Africa. In 1990, Mozambique drafted its first multiparty, democratic constitution. The next year saw multiparty elections in what had been one-party states in Benin, Gabon, and Zambia, as well as the overthrow of Mali’s dictator and, subsequently, the election of new leaders. Every succeeding year brought new steps forward for democracy—in Ghana, Kenya, and the Republic of the Congo in 1992, and elsewhere on the continent in subsequent years. The world only paid attention when South Africa joined the ranks of democratic nations in 1994.

Experts & Staff