Finding the Source: Urbanization and Intersectoral Competition for Water

By
Ruth Meinzen-Dick and Paul P. Appasamy

This article examines the implications of urbanization for intersectoral competition over water, not only in technical or economic terms, but also in terms of political and social dynamics as well as the possibilities to meet the water needs of growing cities. It begins by looking at the water needs of each sector in urban and rural areas—the quantity, timing, and quality of water demand. The article identifies promising technical and institutional options for supply and demand management to provide adequate water services. It concludes by exploring the implications contemporary urban dynamics pose for future water policy.

Experts & Staff

  • Roger-Mark De Souza // Director of Population, Environmental Security and Resilience, Wilson Center
  • Sandeep Bathala // Senior Program Associate, Environmental Change and Security Program, Maternal Health Initiative
  • Katharine Diamond // Program Assistant, Environmental Change and Security Program
  • Benjamin Dills // Program Assistant, Environmental Change and Security Program
  • Lauren Herzer // Program Associate, Environmental Change and Security Program
  • John Thon Majok // Program Associate, Environmental Change and Security Program
  • Schuyler Null // Web Editor and Writer/Editor, Environmental Change and Security Program, Maternal Health Initiative
  • Meaghan Parker // Writer/Editor, Environmental Change and Security Program
  • Sean Peoples // Multimedia Producer and Program Associate, Environmental Change and Security Program
  • Geoffrey D. Dabelko // Senior Advisor, Environmental Change and Security Program
  • Ruth Greenspan Bell // Public Policy Scholar
  • William Krist // Senior Policy Scholar
  • Louise Lief // Public Policy Scholar
  • John W. Sewell // Senior Scholar