Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding Publications

The Price of Neglect: From Resource Conflict to Maoist Insurgency in the Himalayan Kingdom

Jul 07, 2011
Bishnu Upreti’s book, The Price of Neglect: From Resource Conflict to Maoist Insurgency in the Himalayan Kingdom was published in 2004, just as the Maoist insurgency was reaching a fever pitch and violence was spreading to the capital, Kathmandu. more

Pathways to Peace: Defining Community in the Age of Globalization

Jul 07, 2011
Paper contribution to January 2010 seminar on environmental peacebuilding. more

Environmental Peacemaking: Conditions for Success

Jul 07, 2011
Alexander Carius identifies the conditions under which environmental cooperation best facilitates conflict transformation and peacebuilding, and which forms of negotiation or stakeholder participation have been particularly successful. more

U.S. Military and Environmental Security in the Gulf Region

Jul 07, 2011
Oil spills, water shortages, earthquakes, and desertification are only some of the potential environmental threats to the Persian Gulf region’s security, but multilateral and regional efforts to address these problems could help build bridges between nations, writes Rear Admiral John F. Sigler, USN (Ret.). more

Exchange: Violent Environments

Jul 07, 2011
ECSP invited Homer-Dixon, Peluso, and Watts to engage in a dialogue about Violent Environments, as well as the future of environmental security research. more

The Tenth Anniversary of the Dayton Accords and Afterwards: Reflections on Post-Conflict State- and Nation-Building

Jul 07, 2011
This publication stemmed from the December 7, 2005 conference, co-sponsored by East European Studies, West European Studies, and the Southeast Europe Project. The 1995 Dayton Accords ended the violent conflict that raged in Bosnia-Herzegovina from 1992 to 1995. Yet, while the fighting has ended, ten years afterwards the Dayton Accords have not been replaced by a more permanent legal foundation in Bosnia-Herzegovina. More than simply commemorating the end of a war, East European Studies proposes holding a conference to reflect on what the Dayton Accords achieved over the last decade, what remains to be done in terms of creating a cohesive and self-sustaining state in Bosnia-Herzegovina, and what role the international community can play to promote state-building there. A better understanding of the Dayton Accords will add to the knowledge of peace brokering and state-building, which has become highly relevant in terms of U.S. Security Policy towards the wider world. more

"It Always Rains in the Same Place First:" Geographic Favoritism in Rural Burundi

Jul 07, 2011
English; Africa Program Issue Briefing No. 1, July 2005. more

Reflections of His Excellency Paul Kagame on the Tenth Anniversary of the Genocide in Rwanda

Jul 07, 2011
On April 21, 2004, His Excellency Paul Kagame, President of Rwanda, reflected on the tenth anniversary of the tragic genocide in Rwanda. He discussed the root causes of the genocide, the international reaction to the crisis, and the measures that he and his country have been taking to rebuild Rwanda. His presentation was part of Remembering Rwanda, a commemoration of the tenth anniversary of the genocide. The program was co-sponsored by the Africa Program, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the United States Institute of Peace. more

The Role of ECOWAS in Achieving the Economic Integration of West Africa

Jul 07, 2011
On October 19, 2007, the Africa Program hosted an event entitled "The Role of ECOWAS in Achieving the Economic Integration of West Africa" with Dr. Mohamed Ibn Chambas, President of the ECOWAS Commission. more

Changes in U.S. Policy on Africa in the New Administration: What will it mean for AFRICOM?

Jul 07, 2011
U.S. policy is dictated by global political and economic realities as well as domestic U.S. policy priorities. Not only is President Obama faced with the stark reality of an America perceived by many to have lost its moral compass in an increasingly multi-polar world where American power and resource capacities are dwindling and its leadership role being challenged, but the priorities of policy and resource allocation must remain for the short and near-terms on the domestic economic crisis, the two unpopular wars he has inherited and traditional national interest priorities. In the realm of foreign affairs, this means that Europe, Russia, the Middle East, Japan and China will continue to be the highest priorities and, as the developing world intersects with those policy priorities, it will be mostly in the form of India, Brazil, and, perhaps, South Africa. more

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Dialogue

The Future of Higher Education

Mar 26, 2014Apr 02, 2014

Jeff Abernathy and Richard Morrill discuss how colleges and universities are dealing with rapidly rising costs and how the United States can still compete for students in a globalized environment.