Economics and Globalization Publications

155. Shock Therapy In Latin America, Russia, and Eastern Europe

Jul 07, 2011
February 1998 - Has fast reform in Russia and some East European countries created the right incentives for an orderly capitalist economy to develop? Or has it opened the door to a tyranny of the strong over the weak? These are crucial institutional questions raised by the shock therapy strategy of transformation in Eastern Europe, Russia, and Latin America. more

Environment in the U.S. Security Debate: The Case of the Missing Arctic Waters

Jul 07, 2011
This essay asks whether and if so how the United States might employ new understandings of security in the management of Arctic waters issues, and in responding even more particularly to the prospect of intensified use of Russia’s Northern Sea Route. more

Human Population Prospects: Implications for Environmental Security

Jul 07, 2011
Because population projections are generally accepted as expert and reliable, non-demographic analysts tend to see projected population growth as an inevitable and unstoppable force in human affairs. more

Reviews of New Publications (Complete)

Jul 07, 2011
Leaf through expert reviews of 20 recent books and reports at the nexus of population, environment, and security, including The Greening of the U.S. Military, Return of the Population Growth Factor, and Peace Parks: Conservation and Conflict Resolution. more

Oil Conflict and Accumulation Politics in Nigeria

Jul 07, 2011
The author outlines the patterns of accumulation surrounding oil, and their implications for conflict in Nigeria. more

Environment, Population, and Health: Strategies for a More Secure World

Jul 07, 2011
Countries that are overwhelmed by environmental problems tend to develop political and economic problems, writes Jared Diamond, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies. more

Brazil's SIVAM: As It Monitors the Amazon, Will It Fulfill its Human Security Promise?

Jul 07, 2011
As Brazil implements its System for Vigilance of the Amazon (SIVAM), the country's leadership touts it as a major effort towards achieving its national security objectives, but lack of transparency and participation raise concerns. more

Hong Kong Conference Report: Section 7 (English)

Jul 07, 2011
Section 7 reflects on the prospect for environmental cooperation and peacemaking in this and other regions of conflict. more

ECSP Report 12: Table of Contents and Foreword

Jul 07, 2011
ECSP Report 12 analyzes conflicts over natural resources, which are increasingly depleted by population growth, environmental degradation, poverty, and over-consumption. Table of Contents and Foreword. more

317. The Decline of Domestic Politics and Other Taxing Problems in Eastern Europe

Jul 07, 2011
October 2005 - While all governments face the challenge of specifying fiscal arrangements that guarantee the state adequate resources to ward off physical or material threats to the citizenry, the new governments after the collapse of communism faced certain challenges specific to their capitalist transformation. They had to design tax systems within the context of creating an entirely new economic system. Fundamental public sector reforms eliminated the previous system's main source of taxation. As a result of privatization, East European states could no longer rely on appropriating profits from state-owned enterprises. In the past, the state would finance expenditures primarily by transferring revenue from state firms to the federal budget. With a large portion of these enterprises undergoing privatization, the state had to develop a tax policy to collect revenue from private sector production and private individuals. Thus, a wide range of taxes had to be put into place or be significantly reformed, including private property taxes, personal income taxes, inheritance taxes, consumption taxes, real estate taxes, capital gains taxes and excise duties. In allocating the tax burden across these different tax forms, leaders had to reconcile several competing considerations: which kinds of taxes would reliably raise budgetary revenue, which tax forms were hardest to evade, which forms would seem distributionally just to a population raised in a paternalistic state and lacking personal experience in honoring tax responsibilities and which would advance the country's foreign policy goals and international interests. more

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Dialogue

The Future of Higher Education

Mar 26, 2014Apr 02, 2014

Jeff Abernathy and Richard Morrill discuss how colleges and universities are dealing with rapidly rising costs and how the United States can still compete for students in a globalized environment.