Germany Publications

290. Ethnic Cleansing, Communism and Environmental Devastation in Post-War Czechoslovakia

Jul 07, 2011
January 2004 - In the aftermath of World War II, Czechoslovakia expelled close to three million ethnic Germans into occupied Austria and Germany. These so-called Sudeten Germans had long lived in borderland regions ringing the provinces of Bohemia and Moravia, with the heaviest concentration inhabiting the industrially advanced north and west of Bohemia. During and after the expulsions, over two million Czechs settled in the formerly German areas, taking over houses, businesses and factories. The popular Communist Party controlled the resettlement process from the beginning in 1945, using its influence to create a web of patronage in the borderlands. This helped the Party win over 50 percent of the vote in north Bohemia in free elections in May of 1946. Even before Stalinism took hold in Czechoslovakia in 1948, north Bohemia's coal mining, power production and chemical industry were renowned. With the onset of a Communist policy of heavy industrialization, north Bohemia's industry became a model for the entire country. By the 1960s, north Bohemia also became known for its almost unrivaled pollution, with air and water so foul that trees died in waves and children decamped to the mountains for doses of clean air. more

Khrushchev and the Berlin Crisis (1958-62)

Jul 07, 2011
CWIHP Working Paper No. 6 more

East German Spying Reveals NATO War Plans

Jul 07, 2011
CWIHP e-Dossier No. 9 more

Malenkov on the German Question, 2 June 1953

Jul 07, 2011
CWIHP e-Dossier No. 15 more

Introduction to the Willy Brandt Document Collection

Jul 07, 2011
The 22 documents made available in CWIHP e-Dossier No. 22 are a small sample from the 10 volumes of Willy Brandt's selected works published between 2002 and 2009 as "Berliner Ausgabe." more

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Dialogue

The Future of Higher Education

Mar 26, 2014Apr 02, 2014

Jeff Abernathy and Richard Morrill discuss how colleges and universities are dealing with rapidly rising costs and how the United States can still compete for students in a globalized environment.