Population Publications

The Global Family Planning Revolution, Return of the Population Growth Factor, and Population Issues in the 21st Century: The Role of the World Bank

Jul 07, 2011
A trio of reports released in 2007—two from the World Bank, one from the UK Parliament—examine the past, present, and future of family planning programs, highlighting best practices and lessons learned, and offering recommendations for next steps. more

Environmental Change, Security, and Social Conflicts in the Brazilian Amazon

Jul 07, 2011
The author analyzes the multiple and complex relationships between environmental change, notions of security, and social conflicts in the Brazilian Amazon.. more

Issue 15: Fishing for Families: Reproductive Health and Integrated Coastal Management in the Philippines

Jul 07, 2011
The Philippines' rapidly rising population has overwhelmed fisheries, bringing grinding poverty and malnutrition to many coastal communities. But a new approach to conservation may save families along with the fish and their habitats, say Joan Castro and Leona D'Agnes. more

ECSP Report 4: Event Summaries

Jul 07, 2011
Event summaries from meetings sponsored by the Environmental Change and Security Program between May and December 1997. more

Speaking Truth to Silence: There's Still a Place for the Demographic Case

Jul 07, 2011
Robert Engelman analyzes the human and environmental impact of population growth, particularly in the context of Niger and Kenya. more

Commentary: Should Global Poverty be a U.S. National Security Issue? (Part 2)

Jul 07, 2011
ECSP invited analysts to address whether global poverty should and can be a U.S. national security issue (Part 2). more

PECS News Issue 7 (Fall 2002)

Jul 07, 2011
PECS News Issue 7 includes articles by Frederick Meyerson and Geoff Dabelko, and a report from the field from the Peruvian Andes. more

Commentary: What Is To Be Done At Johannesburg?

Jul 07, 2011
Table of Contents, Foreword, and Commentaries on Johannesburg. more

307. The Internationalization of Minority Rights in Poscommunist Europe

Jul 07, 2011
November 2004 - Over the past 15 years, a fascinating experiment has taken place in Europe regarding the codification of minority rights. As communism collapsed in 1989, several ethnic conflicts broke out in the Caucuses and Balkans, and commentators feared that ethnic violence would spiral out of control throughout Central and Eastern Europe. In response, Western democracies decided to "internationalize" the treatment of national minorities in postcommunist Europe, creating a pan-European regime to monitor whether countries are meeting European standards in the treatment of their minorities. Some of these standards have been formulated by the High Commissioner on National Minorities of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE)–a position established in 1993. Other standards were formulated by the Council of Europe (COE) in its 1995 "Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities." Complying with these OSCE and COE standards is required for countries to ‘join the West,' and in particular to join the European Union (EU) and NATO. more

Hong Kong Conference Report: Part 2 (Chinese)

Jul 07, 2011
Through a generous grant from the U.S. Institute of Peace, ECSP organized a forum in Hong Kong to provide opportunities for 65 environmentalists and journalists from the three areas of Greater China to discuss improving the capacity of environmental NGOs and the quality of environmental reporting in the region. Part 2 (Chinese). more

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Dialogue

The Future of Higher Education

Mar 26, 2014Apr 02, 2014

Jeff Abernathy and Richard Morrill discuss how colleges and universities are dealing with rapidly rising costs and how the United States can still compete for students in a globalized environment.