Russia and Eurasia Publications

Transatlantic Academy Calls for Fellowship Applications: 2015-2016 Russia and the West

Aug 21, 2014
The Transatlantic Academy is seeking candidates to serve as resident Fellows from September 2015 – June 2016 to examine the research theme “Russia and the West.” A joint project of the German Marshall Fund of the United States (GMF), the ZEIT-Stiftung Ebelin und Gerd Bucerius, the Robert Bosch Stiftung, the Fritz Thyssen Stiftung, and the Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation, the Transatlantic Academy is located at the GMF office in Washington, DC. Each year, the Academy brings together scholars from Europe and North America to work on a single set of issues facing the transatlantic community. The Academy is an interdisciplinary institution which is open to all social science disciplines, the humanities, and the natural sciences. more

The Russian Federation’s International Development Assistance Programme

Aug 19, 2014
IDS State of the Debate Report: Russia is unique among emerging donors for being a ‘re-emerging’ donor: the Soviet Union was one of the largest donor countries in the world, and Russia’s period as an aid recipient was relatively brief. Russian development cooperation is driven by key security and economic priorities, as well as resulting from commitments made to multilateral organisations. more

Regional and Global Energy Series: Russia, Ukraine, and Energy Security

Aug 13, 2014
Report from the July 1 launch of the Wilson Center’s Regional and Global Energy Series featuring former US Ambassador to Russia and Bulgaria John Beyrle, former NSC Senior Director for Russia, Ukraine and Eurasia (and former US Ambassador to Kazakhstan and Georgia) William Courtney, IHS Energy’s Director, Russian and Caspian Energy (and book co-author) Julia Nanay, and State Department International Energy Coordinator, former NSC Senior Director and former US Ambassador to Ukraine and Mexico, Carlos Pascual, who explored with Jan Kalicki and David Goldwyn the energy and broader dimensions of relations with Russia and Ukraine. more

Photo by Meg Gustafson

Russia: The World's Second-Largest Immigration Haven

Aug 11, 2014
“Immigrants aren't rushing to Moscow in search of opportunity”—President Obama recently stated in an interview with The Economist, while making a larger point about Russia’s receding role in the world. While much of his commentary on the overall state of affairs in Russia was accurate, his comments on a lack of immigrants in Moscow revealed a blind spot in his view of global-migration movements—immigrants have been rushing to Moscow for the last twenty years, and not only to Moscow, but to cities all over Russia. more

Corporate Raiding in Ukraine: Causes, Methods and Consequences

Aug 07, 2014
Corporate raiding in Ukraine is a widely discussed and reported problem that severely damages investment and economic development, prospects for European integration, and the welfare of ordinary people. Yet the phenomenon of raiding itself is only poorly understood, often either dismissed as inseparable from the country's broader problem of endemic corruption, or imputed to powerful and shadowy raiders thought to be immune from defensive measures by private businesses. The author's field research in Ukraine sheds light on the history, causes and methodologies of raiding, as well as on the costs and consequences of raiding for Ukraine's further development. more

A New Agenda for a New Ukraine: Political, Security, and Social Dimensions

Jul 17, 2014
Summary from the July 15, 2014 lecture by Kennan Kyiv Office Director, Dr. Yaroslav Pylynskyi, on the best way forward for Ukraine. more

Chinese Foreign Ministry Documents on Hungary, 1956

May 19, 2014
In CWIHP e-Dossier No. 50, Péter Vámos addresses the controversy over the Chinese role in the Soviet invasion of Hungary in 1956. Using documents from the Chinese Foreign Ministry Archive in Beijing, Vámos argues that the official Chinese position was a distortion of actual events. more

Blurred Identities, Slow Responses, and “Banks vs Tanks” Strategies: The Reasons and Prospects for Ukraine’s Crimean Crisis

Apr 08, 2014
Why was Ukraine so powerless in the occupation and annexation of Crimea? Ukrainians themselves have to find the answers to this question in order to find solutions to the occupation of the peninsula. The comments below discuss the reasons for Ukraine’s vulnerability in its relations with Russia and also examine the ways in which Ukraine should strengthen its sovereignty and ability to protect its statehood. more

In Search of Peace

Apr 07, 2014
A strong state encompasses a whole spectrum of institutions for conflict prevention and management (formal and informal and at the local and national levels). If the state is institutionally weak and illegitimate, conflict will likely occur since the institutional constraints on aggressive predatory behavior are also weak or do not exist at all. The recent conflict in Ukraine illustrates this clearly. more

Why Did Russia Give Away Crimea Sixty Years Ago?

Mar 19, 2014
In 1954 the Soviet Union transferred control of Crimea to Soviet Ukraine. Mark Kramer (Harvard) explains the reasons behind this surprising decision, one which has come back to haunt Ukraine today with tragic consequences. more

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Dialogue

The Future of Higher Education

Mar 26, 2014Apr 02, 2014

Jeff Abernathy and Richard Morrill discuss how colleges and universities are dealing with rapidly rising costs and how the United States can still compete for students in a globalized environment.