U.S. Politics Publications

How Europe and the United States Can Boost Cooperation and Manage Competition in Asia

Dec 12, 2014
In the early 2000s, the European Union (EU) began its own rebalance or pivot toward Asia. The European pivot often competes with the United States in focusing on economic, monetary, technological, and defense-related issues such as arms sales. But the EU and its member states harmonize with U.S. goals in boosting diplomacy, supporting multilateral security fora and regional integration initiatives, and deploying soft power. The EU and the United States should improve their dialogue on Asia to better understand their own interests and priorities, identify areas for cooperation, and manage competition. more

Melting Pot Urgency: Attracting and Educating Entrepreneurs for the U.S.

Nov 26, 2014
Attracting foreign-born talent and teaching entrepreneurial skills are vital to the economic vibrancy of the United States. The United States needs new programs to recruit and retain immigrant entrepreneurs, strengthen K-12 education, and stress experiential, collaborative learning at all levels of education to create jobs and lead the global economy as the world’s entrepreneurship engine. more

Reflections on the Summit: Whither US-Africa Relations?

Aug 22, 2014
The recently concluded US-Africa Leaders Summit, which was held from August 4-6, 2014, was an opportunity to discuss key issues and define a way forward for US-Africa relations. Read Africa Program Director Monde Muyangwa's take on what needs to happen next. more

The Other Deficit— the International One— and How to Shrink It

Jul 02, 2014
U.S. private and public debt to foreigners, including foreign governments, is enormous and still growing. The debt is damaging the US economy and the country’s stature as a world leader. Reducing this debt will require public action to restrain the fiscal deficit and bolster private savings and trade. Ultimately, adopting a national growth and innovation strategy would highlight key economic sectors for balancing international flows of goods, services, and capital. more

The Taiwan Relations Act: The Past and the Future

Apr 08, 2014
Professor Xiaobo Hu counsels that the United States should give priority to the promotion of peaceful relations across the Taiwan Strait, and to the maintenance of stable and constructive ties with both Taipei and Beijing. Toward those ends, Hu argues, Washington should undertake a comprehensive review of the TRA and the policy of “strategic ambiguity” that has characterized U.S. Taiwan Strait policy for many years. more

Leveling the Playing Field for U.S. Trade with Asia

Mar 28, 2014
Current negotiations over trade deals—the TPP across the Pacific and the TTIP across the Atlantic—offer the United States its best chance in decades to create international standards limiting foreign governments’ support for their home industries writes Public Policy Scholar Kent Hughes in this policy brief. more

Is Negotiating Political Agreement a Lost Art?

Mar 11, 2014
A group of political scientists say Congress has forgotten the art of negotiating political agreements and needs to relearn it if our government is to continue to function as intended. Wolfensberger says in today's Congress, with all the distractions during shortened work weeks, simple deliberations are a difficult challenge for most members. more

Congress’ Budgeting Would Baffle a Martian

Feb 26, 2014
Congress passed its first budget in four years, but the twisted path it took to get there would baffle a Martian. more

McConnell’s Lament Stirs Fresh Breeze of Hope

Jan 29, 2014
Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.), in a floor speech January 8, lamented the sorry state of the Senate today, admitted that both parties are to blame for turning the chamber into a campaign studio, and promised to return to deliberative policy making body if Republicans regain majority control next year. more

Czar Speaker Is Vindicated on Overthrow Ruling

Jan 17, 2014
When the House of Representatives removed Speaker Joe Cannon as chairman of the Rules Committee in 1910, it did so by overturning his ruling that changing House rules from the floor is not a constitutional right. Before Cannon left office in 1911, the House reversed itself, perhaps in part because Democrats would be in the majority two months later. The tale is a cautionary one for Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid who recently changed Senate filibuster rules. more

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Dialogue

The Future of Higher Education

Mar 26, 2014Apr 02, 2014

Jeff Abernathy and Richard Morrill discuss how colleges and universities are dealing with rapidly rising costs and how the United States can still compete for students in a globalized environment.