Publications

Mexico's Democratic Challenges: Politics, Government, and Society

May 01, 2010
Only a decade ago, Mexico saw the end of seventy years of single-party hegemonic rule and the first free and fair election in its history. How has the country evolved since then, and what is the status of its democracy today? In this comprehensive new collection intended for use in undergraduate courses a group of distinguished scholars examines recent political developments in Mexico—including its 2006 election and the breakdown in consensus that nearly resulted—in order to assess the progress of its democratization. Focusing on transformations in Mexico's evolving political party system, institutions in transition, and the changing nature of state-society relations, contributors to this book discuss the challenges that Mexican democracy faces today as well as the potential it has for further change in the near future. more

The Fog of Law: Pragmatism, Security, and International Law by Michael J. Glennon

The Fog of Law: Pragmatism, Security, and International Law

May 01, 2010
Focusing on questions of state security, The Fog of Law considers the nature of obligation in international law. In so doing, it challenges the prevailing theories of obligation based on natural law or positive law approaches. more

Rock and Roll in the Rocket City: The West, Identity, and Ideology in Soviet Dniepropetrovsk, 1960–1985 by Sergei I. Zhuk

Rock and Roll in the Rocket City: The West, Identity, and Ideology in Soviet Dniepropetrovsk, 1960–1985

May 01, 2010
In Rock and Roll in the Rocket City, Sergei I. Zhuk assesses the impact of Westernization on the city’s youth, examining the degree to which the consumption of Western music, movies, and literature ultimately challenged the ideological control maintained by state officials. more

Beyond Merida: The Evolving Approach to Security Cooperation

May 01, 2010
While the majority of U.S. funding in the first phase of the Merida Initiative went to expensive equipment, particularly aircraft, the new approach shifts the focus toward institution building. It will attempt to create successful pilot projects, most likely in Tijuana and/or Ciudad Juarez, using a comprehensive approach to public security that could presumably be replicated in other parts of Mexico. more

All the Tsar's Men: Russia's General Staff and the Fate of the Empire, 1898-1914 by John W. Steinberg

All the Tsar's Men: Russia's General Staff and the Fate of the Empire, 1898–1914

May 01, 2010
All the Tsar’s Men examines how institutional reforms designed to prepare the Imperial Russian Army for the modern battlefield failed to prevent devastating defeats in both the 1905 Russo—Japanese War and World War I. more

Realism, Tolerance, and Liberalism in the Czech National Awakening: Legacies of the Bohemian Reformation by Zdeněk V. David

Realism, Tolerance, and Liberalism in the Czech National Awakening: Legacies of the Bohemian Reformation

May 01, 2010
In this meticulous intellectual history, Zdeněk V. David traces the roots of the eighteenth-century Czech National Awakening, not to the Counter Reformation but to the Utraquist church (often called “Hussite”), which arose in pre-Protestant Bohemia. more

Mexico's Democratic Challenges: Politics, Government, and Society, edited by Andrew Selee and Jacqueline Peschard

Mexico's Democratic Challenges: Politics, Government, and Society

May 01, 2010
Only a decade ago, Mexico saw the end of seventy years of single-party hegemonic rule and the first free and fair election in its history. This comprehensive new collection examines recent political developments in Mexico—including its 2006 election and the breakdown in consensus that nearly resulted—in order to assess the progress of its democratization. more

Europe's Destiny: The Old Lady and the Bull by Attila Marján

Europe's Destiny: The Old Lady and the Bull

May 01, 2010
In this engaging, clever, and provocative account, Attila Marján offers a disquieting analysis of the complex challenges that Europe faces in the global marketplace. more

The Caged Phoenix: Can India Fly? by Dipankar Gupta

The Caged Phoenix: Can India Fly?

May 01, 2010
Dipankar Gupta, one of India’s foremost thinkers on social and economic issues, takes a critical—and controversial—look at the limits of the Indian success story in The Caged Phoenix. more

Neoconservatives in U.S. Foreign Policy under Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush: Voices behind the Throne by Jesús Velasco

Neoconservatives in U.S. Foreign Policy under Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush: Voices behind the Throne

May 01, 2010
Jesús Velasco examines the origins and history of the neoconservative political movement so closely identified with the George W. Bush administration's policies of regime change and democratization. more

Pages

Dialogue

The Future of Higher Education

Mar 26, 2014Apr 02, 2014

Jeff Abernathy and Richard Morrill discuss how colleges and universities are dealing with rapidly rising costs and how the United States can still compete for students in a globalized environment.