Publications

 Does North America Exist? Governing the Continent after NAFTA and 9/11 by Stephen Clarkson

Does North America Exist? Governing the Continent after NAFTA and 9/11

Oct 01, 2008
This detailed, meticulously researched, and up-to-date treatment of North America's transborder governance allows the reader to see to what extent the United States's dominance in the continent has been enhanced or mitigated by trilateral connections with its two continental partners. more

Consumption and Social Change in a Post-Soviet Middle Class by Jennifer Patico

Consumption and Social Change in a Post-Soviet Middle Class

Oct 01, 2008
Consumption and Social Change in a Post-Soviet Middle Class presents a much-needed look at the lives of ordinary people in Russia today, contributing both to postsocialist studies of social change and to broader anthropological theorizations of consumption and value. more

Migration, Homeland, and Belonging in Eurasia, edited by Cynthia J. Buckley and Blair A. Ruble with Erin Trouth Hofmann

Migration, Homeland, and Belonging in Eurasia

Oct 01, 2008
Migration, a force throughout the world, has special meanings in the former Soviet lands. Soviet successor countries, each with strong ethnic associations, represent a fascinating mix of the motivations and achievements of migration in Russia and Central Asia. Migration, Homeland, and Belonging in Eurasia examines patterns of migration and sheds new light on government interests, migrant motivations, historical precedents, and community identities. more

PEN 15 - Silver Nanotechnologies and the Environment

Sep 09, 2008
View • Official Report Release Page Widespread use of nanoscale silver will challenge regulatory agencies to balance important potential benefits against the possibility of significant environmental risk, highlighting the need to identify research priorities concerning this emerging technology, according to a new report released today by the Project. more

PEN 14 - The Consumer Products Safety Commission and Nanotechnology

Aug 21, 2008
View Official Report Release Page The inability of the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to carry out its mandate with respect to simple, low-tech products such as children’s jewelry and toy trains bodes poorly for its ability to oversee the safety of complex, high-tech products made using nanotechnology, according to E. Marla Felcher. more

Poll: Risks and Benefits of Synthetic Biology and Nanotechnology

Aug 13, 2008
From August 20 to 25, 2008, Peter D. Hart Research Associates conducted a nationwide survey among 1,003 adults about awareness of and attitudes toward both nanotechnology and synthetic biology. Nearly nine in 10 Americans say they have heard just a little or nothing at all about synthetic biology, according to this 2008 report summarizing the survey findings. more

PEN 13 - Nanotechnology Oversight

Jul 23, 2008
View • Official Report Release Page including webcast. WASHINGTON – Few domestic policy areas that the new administration must address will have greater long-range consequences than nanotechnology — a new technology that has been compared with the industrial revolution in terms of its impact on society. If the right decisions are made, nanotechnology will bring vast improvements to almost every area of daily living. If the wrong decisions are made, the American economy, human health and the environment will suffer. In Nanotechnology Oversight: An Agenda for the Next Administration former Environmental Protection Agency official J. Clarence Davies - one of the nation’s foremost authorities on environmental regulation and policy - identifies the steps the incoming president must take to deal with the potential risks posed by nanotechnology. more

Governments and Muslim Communities in the West: United States, United Kingdom, France and Germany

Jul 14, 2008
Proceedings of a workshop and conference on March 3-5, 2008 more

Thinking Brazil 2.2

Jul 07, 2008
Brazilian Presidential Race, 2002: Will Lula clear the hurdles ahead? (May 2002) more

International Strategies for Innovation: A Study of Seven Countries and Brazil

Jul 07, 2008
Seven of the world's most notably innovative countries—United States, Canada, Ireland, France, United Kingdom, Finland and Japan—have recognized innovation as a key element for improving productivity and competitiveness, as well as advancing social and economic development. Understanding how these countries have succeeded in applying policies, adapting institutions, and using economic incentives and instruments to construct knowledge-based economies was the purpose of an in-depth, ten-month research project, Mobilização Brasileira para a Inovação (Mobit). This report synthesizes the findings of the Mobit study and the proceedings from the seminar. more

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Dialogue

The Future of Higher Education

Mar 26, 2014Apr 02, 2014

Jeff Abernathy and Richard Morrill discuss how colleges and universities are dealing with rapidly rising costs and how the United States can still compete for students in a globalized environment.