U.S. National Security Multimedia

Mark Katz

Leaving Without Losing: The War on Terror After Iraq and Afghanistan

Mark Katz is a professor of government and politics at George Mason University; Robert Litwak is Vice President for Scholars and Academic Relations at the Wilson Center where he also serves as Director of International Security Studies.

America’s War Machine

Molly Sinclair McCartney, Wilson Center Public Policy Scholar and journalist with more than thirty years of experience as a reporter at five different newspapers, including the Washington Post and Miami Herald.

Pakistan’s Most Dangerous Place

Ambassador Akbar Ahmed, the Ibn Khaldun Chair of Islamic Studies at American University; Michael Kugelman, Senior Program Associate, Asia Program, Woodrow Wilson Center

The Future of U.S. Forces in Europe

With guests Mark Hertling, Commanding General of U.S. Army Europe and Robert Litwak, Vice President for Programs at the Wilson Center

Forward Deployed Naval Forces

This week on dialogue guests Captain Pete Pagano and Colonel Mark Desens discuss their nine month deployment across Southwest Asia, the Middle East, and the Mediterranean.

The National Conversation Continues: A Follow Up Discussion with Mr. Y

Host John Milewski sits down with Captain Porter and Robert Litwak of the Wilson Center for a follow up discussion on the National Strategic Narrative.

Rethinking the Important U.S.-Saudi Equation

While Saudi Arabia will remain an essential partner for the foreseeable future, the fundamentals of the U.S.-Saudia bilateral relationship require re-examination. Former Congressman Lee Hamilton discusses forging a relationship resting on a broader, deeper, and stronger foundation.

Beyond a Handshake: Making Peace with Enemies

Denouncing countries and refusing to talk to them may make us feel better in the short-run—but it makes little sense in the long run, says former Congressman Lee Hamilton. We should be confident in the ideals that have underpinned America's global ascent and confident that those ideals will triumph in the long-run, no matter who sits across the negotiating table.

Leaving the Cold War Behind

Russia, though not the superpower it once was, still matters, says former Congressman Lee Hamilton. Our efforts to get relations back on track must be comprehensive and coherent, guided by a clear vision of what both parties want from the U.S.-Russian relationship.

U.S. Can Set the Stage for Global Nuclear Security

Securing nuclear weapons should be the paramount concern of U.S. foreign policy, says former Congressman Lee Hamilton. No threat risks graver repercussions than the detonation of a nuclear weapon on U.S. soil.

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