6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Re-Engaging the United States in Asia: TPP, AIIB, and Competing Frameworks in the Region

April 24, 2015 // 9:00am — 11:00am
From the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement to the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, new economic relations and partnerships are being established across the Asia-Pacific region and beyond. How the United States could utilize existing frameworks, or suggest alternatives, to sustain and expand regional ties remains unclear.

Luther’s Fortress: Martin Luther and His Reformation Under Siege

May 04, 2015 // 2:00pm — 3:30pm
Woodrow Wilson Center Senior Scholar and Historian James Reston, Jr's newest book "Luther's Fortress: Martin Luther and His Reformation Under Siege" describes a crucial but little-known episode in Martin Luther’s life and reveals its pivotal role in the history of Christianity. Drawing on Luther’s correspondence, notes, and other writings, Reston presents an earthy, gripping portrait of the Reformation’s architect during his time in excommunication.

Southern European Energy Corridor: Status, Prospects and Geopolitics

April 14, 2015 // 2:30pm — 4:30pm
New pipelines are carrying natural gas and oil from the Caspian and Russia to Turkey and beyond to Europe. In this southern European landscape, pipeline proposals like Nabucco and South Stream have given way to more focused initiatives, including the Southern Corridor Pipeline and a newly proposed “Turkish Stream” to parallel the Blue Stream pipeline from Russia across the Black Sea to Turkey. At stake is the energy security of Central and Eastern Europe, which historically have depended almost entirely on Russia for their energy supplies.

Security Policy in Sinai: Common Interests or a Collective Failure?

April 08, 2015 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
Ismail Alexandrani discussed the Egyptian army’s security policy in the Sinai Peninsula. He presented the view from the ground based on field investigations and sociological research.

DC Science Hack Day 2015

May 16, 2015 // 9:00am — May 17, 2015 // 5:00pm
Science Hack Day is a 48-hour-all-night event where anyone excited about making weird, silly or serious things with science comes together in the same physical space to see what they can prototype within 24 consecutive hours. Designers, developers, scientists and anyone who is excited about making things with science are welcome to attend – no experience in science or hacking is necessary, just an insatiable curiosity.

Nigeria in Focus: An Assessment of the 2015 Elections

April 07, 2015 // 2:00pm — 3:30pm
On April 7, 2015, the Woodrow Wilson Center Africa Program hosted a panel of experts to assess the outcome of the recent national elections in Nigeria, held on March 28 after a six-week postponement. In an historic election, opposition candidate Muhammadu Buhari of the All Progressive Congress Party (APC) defeated incumbent Goodluck Jonathan of the People’s Democratic Party (PDP).

A Conversation with the President of Tanzania, Jakaya Kikwete

April 03, 2015 // 2:00pm — 3:30pm
On April 3, 2015, the Wilson Center Africa Program was honored to host the President of Tanzania, His Excellency Jakaya Kikwete. As his second and final constitutional term comes to a close, President Kikwete reflected on his presidency, examining his accomplishments, some of the key challenges he has faced, and lessons learned from his 10 years in office.

Assessing U.S. Sanctions: Impact, Effectiveness, Consequences

April 16, 2015 // 8:45am — 3:30pm
Full video from all three panels as well as the keynote address are available here.

Hafu: The Mixed-Race Experience in Japan

April 13, 2015 // 2:00pm — 4:15pm
With nearly 98 percent of the population believed to be nationals of the country, Japan can seem to be a racially homogenous society. For foreigners already calling Japan home, though, living in a country where there is little racial diversity can be a challenge. That includes those who are half-Japanese.

Nudging Our Way towards Energy Efficiency: Psychology, Behavior and the Environment

April 23, 2015 // 12:30pm — 2:00pm
Even as society seeks to improve overall energy efficiency, we make individual decisions every day that have a wasteful effect on our energy use, from driving rather than walking short distances to leaving our computers on when not in use. Please join us for a candid discussion about how psychology and behavioral economics can begin to address our most pressing energy and environmental challenges – and how this can potentially improve policy choices in government and beyond.

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