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After One Hundred Winters: In Search of Reconciliation on America's Stolen Lands

In After One Hundred Winters, award-winning settler historian Margaret Jacobs confronts, from both a personal and academic standpoint, the harsh truth that the United States was founded on the violent dispossession of Indigenous peoples. She reveals how elusive reconciliation has been, past and present, in the U.S. and other settler colonial nations, but also documents promising grassroots efforts to heal historical wounds and make redress for our nation’s haunted past.

Date & Time

Monday
Nov. 29, 2021
4:00pm – 5:30pm ET

Location

Zoom Webinar

Overview

In After One Hundred Winters, award-winning settler historian Margaret Jacobs confronts, from both a personal and academic standpoint, the harsh truth that the United States was founded on the violent dispossession of Indigenous peoples. She reveals how elusive reconciliation has been, past and present, in the U.S. and other settler colonial nations, but also documents promising grassroots efforts to heal historical wounds and make redress for our nation’s haunted past.

Margaret Jacobs is the Charles Mach Professor of History and the Director of the Center for Great Plains Studies at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She has published more than 35 articles and 3 books, primarily about Indigenous child removal and family separation. Her book, White Mother to a Dark Race, won the Bancroft Prize in 2010.  In 2017, she co-founded the Genoa Indian School Digital Reconciliation Project and in 2018, Reconciliation Rising, a multimedia project.

The Washington History Seminar is co-chaired by Eric Arnesen (George Washington University and the National History Center) and Christian Ostermann (Woodrow Wilson Center) and is organized jointly by the National History Center of the American Historical Association and the Woodrow Wilson Center's History and Public Policy Program. It meets weekly during the academic year. The seminar thanks its anonymous individual donors and institutional partners (the George Washington University History Department and the Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest) for their continued support.

Panelists

Liza Black

Liza Black

Assistant Professor of History and Native American and Indigenous Studies, Indiana University
Joshua L Reid

Joshua L Reid

Associate Professor of American Indian Studies and the John Calhoun Smith Memorial Endowed Associate Professor of History, University of Washington

Hosted By

History and Public Policy Program

The History and Public Policy Program strives to make public the primary source record of 20th and 21st century international history from repositories around the world, to facilitate scholarship based on those records, and to use these materials to provide context for classroom, public, and policy debates on global affairs.  Read more

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