Webcast Recap

The “p” in “pTA” emphasizes that the people who fund technology development (through taxes and consumer purchases), and who live with its positive and negative consequences, but are not otherwise formally engaged through advocacy, can and should play a role in technology assessment. 

While some advocates for TA called for the inclusion of participatory practices from the beginnings of the field’s evolution in the U.S., action to implement this idea did not begin until the late 1980s, largely in Europe. In society at large, however, participatory practices have expanded considerably over the past two decades in relation to science and technology in particular, and social decision-making in general. 

During this event we will explore one approach to pTA, the World Wide Views exercise on Biodiversity, a global citizen consultation held in 25 countries on September 15, 2012 that provided input to the Eleventh Council of Parties of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity.

Please click here to view pictures from this event.

Speakers

  • David Rejeski

    Director, Science and Technology Innovation Program; Interim Director, Commons Lab
  • Richard Worthington

    Professor of Politics and Chair of the Program in Public Policy Analysis, Pomona College
  • Darlene Cavalier

    Founder, Science Cheerleader and SciStarter and Contributing editor, Discover Magazine
  • David Sittenfeld

    Forum Program Manager, Museum of Science, Boston
  • Gretchen Gano

    Doctoral Student, Human and Social Dimensions of Science and Technology Program, Arizona State University and the Science Technology and Society Initiative, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Tim Persons

    U.S. Government Accountability Office
  • Mikko Rask

    Head of Research, National Consumer Research Centre, Finland