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Polish Perspectives on the Rapacki Plan for the Denuclearization of Central Europe

On October 2, 1957, speaking before the United Nations General Assembly, Polish Foreign Minister Adam Rapacki proposed the denuclearization of Central Europe. Specifically, Rapacki stated that if East Germany and West Germany denuclearized, so too would Poland. In a coordinated move, Czechoslovakia pledged its willingness to join the endeavor. Taken together, the proposal to denuclearize these four Central European states became known as the “Rapacki Plan.”[1]

 

'At the very heart of Europe': New Evidence on John Major's Foreign Policy

The British National Archives in Kew is a special place.

In 2013, it began its move towards releasing records when they reach 20 years old, instead of 30 years. Since then, two further years’ worth of government records are being transferred to the archives year until 2022, when the archives will receive the records from 2001 and 2002.

An Underutilized Bonanza: Using Existing Oral Histories vs. Conducting One’s Own Interviews

Students of more recent political events are often keen to interview former officials. I know I was.

Vladimir Putin’s Stasi ID: A Press Sensation and Its Historical Reality

Recently, a press sensation began in Germany and spread across the globe when an identification card from the East German Ministry of State Security (MfS, or Stasi) was found in the Stasi Records Archive with the name and picture of the Russian President Vladimir Putin.

(On a personal note, I did not find the ID card, despite some early press reports to the contrary.)

It has been a well-known fact that Putin served from 1985 to 1990 as a KGB officer in Dresden; now, some journalists decided, he had worked for the Stasi as well!

North Korea and the Stasi Archives

East German Stasi files from the 1980s paint a contradictory picture of ideological discord and solidarity, while also revealing North Korea’s reactions to a rapidly changing world

When looking over the existing research on North Korean history, one will discover a relatively low number of studies dealing with the 1980s, especially in the Western literature.

The Giulio Andreotti Archive: A First-Hand Account of NATO

A joint Wilson Center-Roma Tre University-Istituto Sturzo project leads to the release of documents from the Archive of Giulio Andreotti.

Giulio Andreotti (Rome, 1919-2013) was one of the most important figures in Italian politics after the Second World War.

The Emir Farid Chehab Collection

The Wilson Center’s History and Public Policy Program is pleased to announce the addition of a major new collection to its Digital Archive, the Emir Farid Chehab Collection.

Nuclear History Resources at the Library of Congress

The Library of Congress might not be the first place scholars think to visit when researching nuclear history. The National Archives and Records Administration in College Park, the Foreign Relations of the United States series, various US presidential libraries, and international archives (UK, IAEA, etc) may come to mind first. However, the Library of Congress should not be discounted. There are a number of resources regarding nuclear history available to researchers at the Library of Congress, including:

Central Asia and the Global Cold War

A View from Russian and Tajikistani Archives

 

On May, 1, 1960, Francis Gary Powers took off in a U-2 spy plane from an airbase in Pakistan, flew over Afghanistan and into Soviet airspace, where he proceeded to photograph industrial and military installations before being shot down near Cheliabinsk, in Siberia.

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