Arts and Literature

Community Development: The Power and Potential of Creative Placemaking Part 2

What is “Creative Placemaking” and what is its role in shaping neighborhoods, towns, and cities? Following a conference of artists, community development experts, and policymakers convened by the Wilson Center’s Urban Sustainability Laboratory, together with the National Endowment for the Arts, the Kresge Foundation, ArtPlace America, and Partners for Livable Communities, we spoke with some of the conference participants and asked them to help us answer the question. Part 1 provides an overview of Creative Placemaking and the possibilities it represents.

Community Development: The Power and Potential of Creative Placemaking Part 1

What is “Creative Placemaking” and what is its role in shaping neighborhoods, towns, and cities? Following a conference of artists, community development experts, and policymakers convened by the Wilson Center’s Urban Sustainability Laboratory, together with the National Endowment for the Arts, the Kresge Foundation, ArtPlace America, and Partners for Livable Communities, we spoke with some of the conference participants and asked them to help us answer the question. Part 1 provides an overview of Creative Placemaking and the possibilities it represents.

Brent Lindsay and Amy Pinto and Community-Specific Theater

A garage door dominates the cinderblock industrial storefront tucked onto Santa Rosa, California’s Sebastopol Avenue next door to the Criminal Baking Company and uncomfortably close to a major highway cloverleaf. Only a splash of purple paint and a seemingly handmade red sign suggest what lurks inside – an exciting scrappy theater company -- The Imaginists -- dedicated to art, activism and community, bringing theater to the disenfranchised and the disenfranchised to contemporary American theater.

Grace Srinivasan and Paula Maust and Baroque Music

On almost any given Sunday nine blocks west of the White House on Washington’s Pennsylvania Avenue, the parishioners of Saint Stephen Martyr Catholic Church are transported to thoughts of Heaven by the golden soprano voice of Cantor Grace Srinivasan. Srinivasan, who grew up in the Washington area, graduated with degrees in music from nearby George Washington University, and studied ballet, the cello, and, later, voice at Baltimore’s Peabody Conservatory.

Urban Life and Creativity: From Conflict to Cultural Innovation

What role does the experience of urban life play in stimulating creativity? In his newest book, “The Muse of Urban Delirium,” author Blair Ruble writes about the challenges of urban diversity, conflict, and creativity by examining the emergence of artistic expression in a series of specific cities at particular times. His analysis provides the focus for this edition of Wilson Center NOW.

Guest

3 Reasons Why The Arts Should Be Taken More Seriously

“Across history, across regimes of government, if you ever wanted to find the truth, you’d always go to the poet”– Mitchell J. Landrieu, Mayor, City of New Orleans

Vanessa German and Spoken Word Opera

One afternoon in December 2016, well over one-hundred denizens of official Washington crowded into an auditorium in the Woodrow Wilson Center to celebrate “creative placemaking.”  With NEA Chair Jane Chu, New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu, and Kresge Foundation President Rip Rapson looking on, a young African-American artist stepped to the stage and transported the entire room into another dimension with her moving poem about the children of the Homewood neighborhood in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  German transformed the afternoon into a spiritual awakening with what many were calling the most

Hollywood Made in China

American studios want a bigger piece of China’s USD 6.8 billion box office.

They are willing to edit scripts and flatter China to get it. The Chinese government wants to limit American cultural influence in China, but also to use Hollywood to build China’s soft power. Washington has taken note of China’s ambitions, the lack of reciprocity in cultural and commercial relations, and Beijing’s ability to leverage its market to influence American film. The issue is becoming central to U.S.-China relations.

Paata and Irina Tsikurishvili and Physical Theater

Paata and Irina Tsikurishvili arrived in the United States with their own immigrant dream: to integrate their distinctive brand of physical theater into American theatrical life. As The New York Times has noted, their vision produces an “elegant fusion of dance and experimental theater.” Their approach draws on the long-standing theatrical traditions of their homeland, the country of Georgia, which merges physicality and mime into an exceptional brand of performance.

The Political Performances of Peng Liyuan

I have been an ordinary warrior of the fine arts”– Peng Liyuan, 2007

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