Arts and Literature

Tolstoy's Esthetics and the Modern Idiom in Art (1985)

Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; Kennan Institute Occasional Paper Series #197, 1985. PDF 35 pages.

Soviet Theatre in Transition (1985)

Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; Kennan Institute Occasional Paper Series #195, 1985. PDF 31 pages.

The Paperscape: A View from the Flag Tower of the Smithsonian Institution Building. An Attempt at Introspection; or How Some Stack of Paper Turns into a Russian Novel (1982)

Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; Kennan Institute Occasional Paper Series #161, 1982. PDF 38 pages.

Constructivism and Early Soviet Fashion Design (1981)

Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; Kennan Institute Occasional Paper Series #148, 1981. PDF 20 pages.

Films without Film: The Birth Pangs of Soviet Cinema (1981)

Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; Kennan Institute Occasional Paper Series #142, 1981. PDF 23 pages.

Theater and Revolution: From Cult to Proletkul't (1981)

Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; Kennan Institute Occasional Paper Series #139, 1981. PDF 22 pages.

Discontinuity in the Spread of Popular Print Culture, 1917-1927 (1981)

Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; Kennan Institute Occasional Paper Series #138, 1981. PDF 44 pages.

Books in the Soviet Second Economy (1980)

Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; Kennan Institute Occasional Paper Series #116, 1980. PDF 16 pages.

Dumping Oils: Soviet Art Sales and the Soviet-American Relations, 1928-1933 (1977)

Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; Kennan Institute Occasional Paper Series #30, 1977. PDF 47 pages.

A Muslim Tale of Two Cities: ‘We Met the Trains’

The forced migration of Muslims from the Balkans to Turkey is one of the least known movements of people in modern times. In A Muslim Tale of Two Cities: ‘We Met the Trains’  Frances Trix focuses on urban Muslims from the central Balkans and the hometown associations they founded in Turkish cities. The oldest of these, one from Skopje, is now second only to the Red Crescent in urban outreach in Istanbul. Trix describes the background of this group and their city—its Ottoman heritage, their becoming a minority, and why they had to leave their homes.

Pages