Biodiversity

Preserving the Amazon: A Race Against Time

Researchers from the United States and the state of São Paulo met at a FAPESP (Foundation for Research Support of the State of São Paulo) symposium in Washington, DC to present the latest findings from their studies of the Amazon. The “FAPESP-U.S. Collaborative Research on the Amazon” meeting was organized in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy and the Brazil Institute of the Wilson Center. One of the featured speakers was noted biodiversity expert, Tom Lovejoy. We spoke with him about the state of the Amazon and efforts to preserve its endangered ecosystem.

FAPESP-U.S. Collaborative Research on the Amazon

WASHINGTON, DC SYMPOSIUM HIGHLIGHTS THE IMPORTANCE OF RESEARCH ON THE AMAZON

The Future of Food, Climate, and the Natural World: A Conversation With Jonathan Foley

Appointed to lead the prestigious California Academy of Sciences in August, Jonathan Foley is tasked with leading a world class institution in the pursuit of discovering, documenting, and sharing knowledge of the natural world.  Serving as one of the largest museums of natural history in the world, the California Academy of Sciences has a clear mission of promoting exploration, providing educational opportunities, and engaging the public.

Brazil Institute Annual Report 2011-2013

Highlighting all major events, Awards Dinners and Special Initiatives, the 2011-2013 Report of Activities gives a comprehensive report on what the Brazil Institute has done in the last two years. 

 

Raising the Bar for REDD+: Strengthening the Role of Women and Gender Equality

Since 2005, the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation program (REDD+) has functioned as a mechanism to financially incentivize the preservation of forestlands in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. But beyond its original use, some organizations have also started exploring ways it can help with other development initiatives, like women’s empowerment.

Where Is the Blue Carbon Going?

“Blue carbon,” the carbon taken up and stored by coastal and marine ecosystems, represents a vast, previously unrecognized natural carbon sink. Coastal blue carbon habitats, including salt marshes, mangroves, and seagrasses, sequester carbon at rates 10 times higher than forested ecosystems and store carbon in their soil that is often hundreds or thousands of years old.

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