Biodiversity

Brazil Institute Annual Report 2011-2013

Highlighting all major events, Awards Dinners and Special Initiatives, the 2011-2013 Report of Activities gives a comprehensive report on what the Brazil Institute has done in the last two years. 

 

Raising the Bar for REDD+: Strengthening the Role of Women and Gender Equality

Since 2005, the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation program (REDD+) has functioned as a mechanism to financially incentivize the preservation of forestlands in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. But beyond its original use, some organizations have also started exploring ways it can help with other development initiatives, like women’s empowerment.

Where Is the Blue Carbon Going?

“Blue carbon,” the carbon taken up and stored by coastal and marine ecosystems, represents a vast, previously unrecognized natural carbon sink. Coastal blue carbon habitats, including salt marshes, mangroves, and seagrasses, sequester carbon at rates 10 times higher than forested ecosystems and store carbon in their soil that is often hundreds or thousands of years old.

CEF's latest dam interactive map reported by Quartz

To read the full article on Quartz, please see http://qz.com/196716/chinas-addiction-to-hydropower-in-two-dam-maps/

CEF Director Jennifer Turner interviewed by Living On Earth on China's hydropower overload

For the past 65 years, China has built nearly two dams per day, and wants to expand its hydroelectric capacity. Jennifer Turner, director of the China Environment Forum at the Washington DC's Wilson Center, tells host Steve Curwood that China plans to ramp up dam installation in Yunnan Province, which raises the risks for this biodiversity hotspot in Southwest China.

The Great Lakes St. Lawrence Region: Improving Policy Outcomes Through Research and Engagement

The Great Lakes-St Lawrence Basin contains 18 percent of the world's freshwater and is home to 42 million people. While these waters are essential to Canada and the United States' quality of life, the current state and future sustainability of the basin continue to challenge policy makers.

Tracks in the Amazon

When construction of the Madeira-Mamoré Railroad began in 1867, Bolivia had lost its war with Chile, causing it to become landlocked and unable to ship its minerals and other products from the Pacific Coast. Since Bolivia needed to find a way to move products from the Atlantic Coast, the government decided a railroad should be built around the Madeira River--which originates in Bolivia and travels almost 2,000 miles through Brazil to the Amazon--facilitating shipment to foreign markets via the Amazonian waterway.

Forests on Film: New Stories from Nepal and the Congo Basin

Given growing awareness about environmental change and how it affects human life, it is perhaps not surprising there is also a growing audience for environmental filmmaking. At the 2014 Environmental Film Festival in the Nation’s Capital on March 25, the Wilson Center premiered ECSP’s latest documentary, Scaling the Mountain: Protecting Forests for Families in Nepal.

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