Biodiversity

Climate Change and Extreme Weather: Impacts on Public Health and Agriculture

Climate change manifests itself in ways far beyond a slowly rising global mean surface temperature. Scientific data is making  the public increasingly aware that a changing climate causes alterations in size, strength and frequency of storms, droughts, floods and other weather events, with significant potential consequences for public health, agriculture, biodiversity and social systems. 

Climate Change Adaptation and Peacebuilding in Africa: An Adaptation Partnership Workshop Report

On Thursday, November 1 and Friday November 2, 2012, USAID and the U.S. Department of State, in partnership with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Institute for Security Studies (Africa Program, Project on Leadership and Building State Capacity and the Environmental Change and Security Program), and IRG/Engility, convened a select group of experts, practitioners, and policymakers from both the United States and Africa in Washington, DC for a conference focused on the third area of concern – climate change adaptation (CCA) and peacebuilding in Africa.

Mycotoxins: Triple Threat to African Development

Mycotoxins are increasingly recognized as a major threat to economic, social and human progress, especially in the developing world.  The event featured experts from the rapidly growing community of practice on mycotoxins, as well as development officials and representatives of private firms, to discuss growing evidence of the impacts on African agriculture, health and trade as well as emerging methods for mitigating the risks. Progress under the Program for Aflatoxin Control in Africa was featured.

The Devouring Dragon: How China’s Rise Threatens Our Natural World

While China’s rise is often viewed through its wide-ranging political and economic effects on the world, its growing impacts on the physical planet will leave a more permanent legacy. In his new book, The Devouring Dragon, Craig Simons argues that China’s growing consumer demands have pushed China from being a small player in global resource consumption to its most voracious participant in just a decade. China’s transition is already having massive impacts on the environment.

CES 12 Preview: Sustainable Coffee Growing in Yunnan

The following has been adapted from an article in the forthcoming China Environment Series 12.

On September 7, 2012, the largest of at least seven Mekong River hydroelectric power stations came online in Pu’er, Yunnan—a southwestern province that is China’s most biodiverse. The Nuozhadu hydroelectric station, Asia’s tallest dam, turned on the first of its nine generating units that will eventually supply 23.9 billion kilowatts of electricity by 2014.

Fishing for Families: Reporting on Population, Environment, and Food Security in the Philippines

“My income is just right to feed us three times a day,” Jason Bostero told Sam Eaton in the rural Philippine village of Humayhumay.

Global Warming Experts Should Think More About the Cold War

Every year the United Nations convenes diplomats from more than 190 nations to negotiate a climate change treaty, and in many years negotiators go home with little more than the promise of another annual meeting.

After the failure of the 18th such event earlier this month in Doha, diplomats and organizers should focus less on the UN exercise than on combing history for a more suitable model.

They might find at least three lessons from the history of arms control.

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