Border Security | Wilson Center

Border Security

The Northern Northern Border: Homeland Security Priorities in the Arctic: Mike Sfraga Testifies Before the Committee on Homeland Security

Polar Institute Director Mike Sfraga testified before the House Homeland Subcommittee on Transportation & Maritime Security.

The testimonies of all the witnesses can be downloaded here>>> 

 

Border Security and Counter-Narcotics

Cross-border criminal activity fueled by illegal drugs is causing great damage in both Mexico and the United States.  The two governments need to prioritize forging an agreed strategy and action agenda to tackle this serious problem.  They should establish a permanent cabinet-level group to oversee bilateral counter-narcotics and cross-border crime cooperation and to monitor progress.

'Countering the Global Narcotics Epidemic – The United States’ Counternarcotics Strategy': Earl Anthony Wayne Testifies before the U.S. Senate Caucus on International Narcotics Control

 

Download the document below for full version of testimony.

Sixth Annual Building a Competitive U.S.-Mexico Border Conference

The Wilson Center's Mexico Institute and the Border Trade Alliance held the sixth annual high-level "Building a Competitive U.S.-Mexico Border" conference, which focused on improving border management in order to strengthen the competitiveness of both the United States and Mexico. Topics covered at the conference included USMCA (the renegotiated NAFTA), strengthening security and efficiency at border ports of entry, the impact of tariffs and reduced staffing on trade, and growing crossborder cooperation for regional economic development.

Fight Cross-Border Crime with Collaboration, Not Threats

The United States and Mexico face a powerful onslaught of criminal activity damaging both countries. They need to step up cooperation now. U.S. threats are counterproductive.

Mexico's Migrant Issues Expose Trump's Faulty Border Logic

Record numbers of migrants, over 70 percent of whom are from Guatemala and Honduras, are being processed by immigration officials. Asylum claims are up more than 1,000 percent since 2013.

Shelters along the border are overwhelmed, and the government is scrambling to keep up. This may sound like the introduction to every article you have read about the U.S. southwest border crisis, yet the prior statements refer not to the United States but to Mexico.

Ground Truth Briefing | The Consequences of a U.S.-Mexico Border Shutdown

Over the past week, President Trump has renewed threats to shut down the U.S.-Mexico border. This comes at a time when Mexico is making new efforts to lower the number of people entering the United States through Mexico. In recent months, there has been a dramatic surge in the number of migrants crossing into the United States at or between official ports of entry on the southern border.

Mexico is Learning that if You Give Trump an Inch, He'll Take a Mile

Mexico is rapidly learning that appeasing Donald Trump is, at best, a short-term solution.

Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (AMLO) has adopted an attitude of placation and appeasement in his dealings with Trump and has tried to either ignore provocations from the White House or make concessions to avoid an unwanted spat. That strategy has failed.

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