Border Security

Three Alternatives to a Wall That Will Strengthen the Southern U.S. Border

This article was originally published on January 12 in The Hill.

The impasse over President Trump’s demand for the $5.7 billion wall funding has resulted in one of the longest government shutdowns in U.S. history, threats to declare a national emergency and over 800,000 federal workers living without pay.

Where Do We Go from Here?: Merida 2.0 and the Future of Mexico-U.S. Security Cooperation

The inauguration of Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador on December 1, 2018 opens a new era in the country's security relationship with the United States. For the past 11 years, the United States and Mexico have anchored that relationship in a policy of shared responsibility where increased collaboration to address common security challenges has been the hallmark.

Infographic: What's Happening at the U.S.-Mexico Border?

'Narcos: Transnational Cartels and Border Security': Earl Anthony Wayne Testifies before the U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Border Security and Immigration

 

Watch the Full Hearing > > 

Download the document below for full version of testimony.

Cooperation between Mexico and the United States regarding transnational crime is vital. Both societies pay a high price for the illegal traffic in drugs, money, guns and people that cross our common border.

Beyond Preclearance: The Next Generation Canada-U.S. Border

Canada and the United States share a long history of border innovation and excellence. Four major bi-national efforts since the 1995 Shared Border Accord created our current framework for cooperation, culminating in the 2011 Beyond the Border Action Plan. The 2015 Land, Rail, Marine and Air Transport Preclearance Agreement (LRMA) also promises to generate incremental benefits in the coming years.

Is Deterrence Enough? Deterrence Policies in Mexico, and Finding a Way Forward in the U.S.-Mexico Bilateral Relationship on Migration

Deterrence strategies, such as deportation and detention, are a component of the United States and Mexico’s bilateral strategy to manage migratory flows from Central America. While deterrence strategies have had some success in the United States in deterring migrants from Mexico, there is little evidence to show that they have effectively reduced the rates of migration from the Northern Triangle.

Venezuelan Emigration, Explained

The massive outflow of Venezuelan citizens to other countries of Latin America and the Caribbean continues unabated, fueled by Venezuela’s economic collapse and repression of political dissent.  According to the United Nations, 2.3 million people—or 7 percent of Venezuela’s population—have fled the country, with more than 1.6 million having left since 2015.  The vast majority have gone to neighboring Colombia, straining the government’s ability to provide food, shelter, and medical care, but significant numbers have also entered Brazil, Ecuador, Peru, Chile, and Argentina.

Infographic | What Did AMLO Propose to Trump?

Chocolate Cars, Sales Taxes, and a Bit of Donald Trump: The U.S.-Mexico Border in the 2018 Mexican Elections

Politics at the Limits of Mexico
On May 20, the Mexican presidential candidates will hold a debate in Tijuana, whose city motto Aquí empieza la patria (“The Nation Begins Here”) subtly pushes back against Mexico City’s centralization of power and policymaking.

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