Border Security

Priorities for Mexico's New U.S. Ambassador

“The principal task of Ambassador Carlos Sada Solana should not be to respond in a direct manner, to the anti-Mexican discourse that is rampant during this electoral period, but rather to address this rhetoric in a strategic fashion.”

Third Annual "Building a Competitive U.S.-Mexico Border" Conference

The Wilson Center's Mexico Institute and the Border Trade Alliance held our third annual Building a Competitive U.S.-Mexico Border conference, which focused on improving border management in order to strengthen the competitiveness of both the United States and Mexico.

The "Bridge to Nowhere" Now Connects the United States and Mexico

On February 4, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto and U.S. Secretaries of Homeland Security and Commerce are scheduled to inaugurate a new border crossing just south of El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua. Once called the “bridge to nowhere” because the U.S.

Lessons from the Development of Binational and Civil Society Cooperation on Water Management at the U.S.-Mexico Border

Mexico and the United States are partners in a number of agreements that imply joint management of natural resources and have had a long and productive history of sharing water resources. The two countries share water resources in the Colorado and Tijuana river basins, and in the Rio Grande basin; the joint utilization of their waters is defined by the Treaty of February 3, 1944 and its Minutes. 

Becoming a Useful Tool for Governments: The Evolution of the North American Development Bank

After two decades of operation, the North American Development Bank (NADB) celebrated its 20th anniversary with ample  possibilities of becoming a more meaningful and useful tool for Mexico and the United States in their bilateral agenda and, more specifically, for their border communities. Furthermore, NADB is one of the few truly bilateral entities; its evolution provides good lessons for border management and for future institution-building.

An Overview of U.S.-Mexico Border Relations

Since the mid-19th century, the U.S.-Mexico border has been many things to many people: a frontier, a scar, a line, a liability, a threat, and an opportunity. Depending on one’s vantage and frame of reference, the border is any or all of these at once.

The Lessons of Post-9/11 Border Management

Shortly after the horrific attacks in Paris, French President François Hollande announced a decision to close his nation’s borders. He said, “We must ensure that no one comes in to commit any act whatsoever, and at the same time make sure that those who have committed these crimes should be arrested if they try to leave the country.”

Attack on Paris: How Should We Respond?

Wilson Center Public Policy Fellow James Hollifield analyzes the attack on Paris and cautions how we should and should not respond.

Infographic | Homeland Security as a Theory of Action: The Impact on U.S./Mexico Border Management

Managing the Mexico-U.S. Border: Working for a More Integrated and Competitive North America

The border between Mexico and the United States is one of the most dynamic in the world. The United States and Mexican border states together represent the world’s 4th largest economy, see more than $500 billion dollars per year in bilateral trade, and house 56 crossing points where nearly 300,000 vehicle crossings take place on a daily basis.

Pages