China Environment | Wilson Center

China Environment

Can Algae Impact Climate Change?

Dr. Brian Walsh discusses his new paper, New Feed Sources Key to Ambitious Climate Targets, which finds replacing microalgae as animal feed could free up significant land currently used for pasture and feed crops, while meeting 50 percent of our annual energy needs and potentially reducing global atmospheric carbon concentrations to preindustrial levels by the end of the century.

Tracking the Energy Titans: Hidden Trends in the United States, China, and Canada [Infographic]

Back in high school physics we learned the first law of thermodynamics: Energy within a closed system must remain constant. In other words, the total amount of energy cannot increase or decrease without some sort of outside interference.

New Partnerships for Clearing the Air in Asia’s Cities

Asian cities are at the frontlines in the fight against air pollution. These cities are engines of economic growth, but often lack the tools and capacity they need to better manage air quality. Jane Nishida (U.S. EPA) and Wei Kuo-yen (EPA Taiwan) will provide examples of how their jointly created International Environmental Partnership (IEP) initiative has promoted the transfer of best practices to help cities in Asia clear their air. Wei Kuo-yen will highlight some examples from Taiwanese cities lowering their PM2.5 emissions.

CEF Director Jennifer Turner Talked on NPR about How Can Beijing Get Enough Snow for 2022 Winter Olympics

Among the questions raised by Beijing's bid for the Winter Olympics was this one. Where are they going to get the snow? In its evaluation of the bid, the Olympic Committee noted minimal snowfall in the area, so the games, they concluded, will rely completely on artificial snow. Jennifer Turner, CEF Director at Wilson Center was interviewed by NPR's Melissa Block on water issues for 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics.

As Beijing Prepares To Host Winter Olympics, Where Will It Get The Snow?

NPR's Melissa Block talks with Jennifer Turner, director of the China Environment Forum at the Woodrow Wilson Center, about water resources and environmental concerns in the extremely arid region.

Making Food Safe and Sustainable in China

*Event will be LIVE webcast.*

The leading source of water pollution in China is not industry or municipal waste, rather the country’s vast agricultural sector—pesticide and fertilizer runoff from fields and animal waste from industrial-scale farms. 

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