China Environment | Wilson Center

China Environment

Cleaner and Greener Chinese Direct Investment in the U.S. Energy Sector

Despite China’s slowing domestic economic growth, global foreign direct investment (FDI) by Chinese companies increased 14 percent in the first half of this year. Here in the United States, many of those investments are fueling new U.S. clean energy projects in solar, wind, battery storage, and other emerging clean-tech sectors. When channeled correctly these investments can be a boon for the U.S. energy economy.

Christian Science Monitor Reported CEF Panel on Combatting Environmental Degradation and Poverty in Western China

In Western China, abundant but fragile natural resources are juxtaposed against lagging economic development. Citizens now can apply for micro-loans to get started in farming, provided they operate in ways that are not damaging to the environment.  These new sustainable models are quickly catching on, NGO leaders said at a panel hosted Monday by the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington. 

CEF Director Jennifer Turner Quoted in a VICE Sports’ Article on the Golf Clamp Down in China

In China, golfers pay more than $50,000 annually to enjoy what has long been a wealthy person's sport. Now, many club members across the world's most populous nation are probably clamoring to get their money back, because the Party’s aims to fight corruption and preserve the environment.

Golf courses, though they can sometimes be a boon for a local economy, require large amounts of freshwater to be maintained, and reduce the amount of land available for farming.

CEF Program Associate Susan Shifflett Interviewed by CCTV-America on Food Safety and Supply

Safety is just one part of the food supply chain. The other is the availability of food in the first place. CCTV-America interviewed CEF Program Associate Susan Shifflett on food issues.

CEF Director, Jennifer Turner, was interviewed by CCTV America on China’s water solution

Water shortages are giving rise to the transformation of Chinese cities into what’s called ‘sponge cities’ where rain water is collected rather than allowed to run off. CEF Director, Jennifer Turner was interviewed by CCTV America on water solutions in China. 

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