China Environment | Wilson Center

China Environment

CEF Associate, Susan Chan Shifflett, Interviewed by the Guardian on China’s Food Security and Safety

For the past three decades an onslaught of urban development, desertification, and pollution has been eating away at China’s once-endless sprawl of tiny farms. China is facing radical challenge to feed its large population. “You have urbanization — people travel abroad,” says Susan Chan Shifflett, China Environment Forum’s associate. “They go to France, they see cheese, and they think, ‘why can’t I have brie in China?’ They’re changing their diets — meat consumption has quadrupled over the past 30 years.”

Film screening: "Cotton Road" for Environmental Film Festival in the Nation’s Capital

Americans consume nearly 20 billion new items of clothing each year. However, few of us know how our clothes are made, much less who produces them. Cotton Road follows the commodity of cotton from South Carolina farms to Chinese factories to illuminate the work and industrial processes in a global supply chain.

  • Speakers

Matt McFall, Private Sector Engagement, World Wildlife Fund

Laura Kissel, Producer, Cotton Road

A Global Choke Point Report: China's Water-Energy-Food Roadmap

The water-energy-food nexus is creating a complicated challenge for China and the world. Energy development requires water. Moving and cleaning water requires energy. Food production at all stages—from irrigation to distribution—requires water and energy. As the most populous country and the world’s manufacturing hub, China demands all three resources in ever increasing amounts, leading to shortages that are creating serious choke points to the country’s development. Pressure on water is at the heart of these resource constraints facing China. 

China's Hottest Tech Giants Join the 'War on Pollution'

China’s hottest tech giants – Alibaba, Xiaomi, and Baidu – are making a splash on a global scale. But even as they battle for market shares, they are also helping Chinese people fight against pollution with newly released tech products that monitor air, water, and food pollution. While the government struggles to keep the country’s airways clean, these companies are enabling ordinary Chinese citizens to take environmental health into their own hands.Increasingly, Chinese people are eating, breathing, and drinking pollution. Here are some sobering statistics:

Clearing the Air: Is Natural Gas a Game Changer for Coal in China?

gas-terminal-China

From Farm to Roundtable: Innovative Partnerships to Improve China's Meat Supply Chains

The first amendments to China's Food Safety Law are likely to pass this year and they will bring new tracking and training systems, stricter health standards, and higher penalties for illegal production and management of food and food additives. To increase the efficiency, safety and sustainability of the country's food supply chains, especially meat, the Chinese government and industries also have expanded partnerships with international organizations.

The next step in China-LAC links

With infrastructure projects booming, Latin America has been buying more steel from China, which is coping with surpluses. [Photo/Provided to China Daily]

The Diplomat Reported CEF Coal Cap Meeting

Whether a Chinese coal cap by 2030 is feasible was the subject under discussion at a Capping China’s Coal event by the China Environment Forum of the Wilson Center on November 24th. The general consensus was that such a cap is possible, and recent positive signs (like the U.S.-China joint announcement on emissions reduction targets) indicate the government is taking the problem seriously. Still, there’s a lot of work to be done to ensure that China’s coal use reaches a peak soon.

U.S.-China Cooperation: The Significance of the Joint Agreement on Climate Change and Clean Energy

The deal, a surprise to many, has been called, “historic.” Last month, U.S. President Barack Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping announced both countries will curb their greenhouse gas emissions over the next two decades. Is this the game changer that those calling for action have been waiting for? Will this create momentum for increased international cooperation? And what does the deal address beyond carbon emissions? China Environment Forum Director, Jennifer Turner provides analysis.

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