China Environment | Wilson Center

China Environment

The U.S. National Intelligence Council's Global Trends 2015: Excerpts, Commentaries, and Response

In January 2001, the U.S. National Intelligence Council (NIC), a center within the Central Intelligence Agency that provides the agency’s director with mid- and long-term strategic thinking and direction, published Global Trends 2015: A Dialogue About the Future with Nongovernmental Experts. This unclassified and public report, which expanded on the NIC’s previous effort Global Trends 2010, takes a look at the world over the next 15 years from the perspective of the national security policymaker.

ECSP Report 4

ECSP Report 4 includes pieces on the role of environmental degradation in population displacement; U.S. population policy since the Cairo conference; and a synthesis of the connection between environmental transformation and conflict. The issue also explores forest plunder in Southeast Asia, and the U.S.-China relationship over environment. Complete report.

ECSP Report 4: Special Reports

Environmental Degradation and Migration The U.S.-Mexico Case Study, by The Natural Heritage Institute

ECSP Report 4: Event Summaries

Event summaries from meetings sponsored by the Environmental Change and Security Program between May and December 1997:

Climate Action in the United States and China (English)

This pamphlet sets the context and summarizes the actions taken by the United States and China to address the threat of global climate change. The purpose is not to judge the actions of one country against the other but to help each country understand the existing activities and accomplishments of the other as a foundation for dialogue. It does not attempt to provide a comprehensive source of information about activities in each country but instead highlights activities that have resulted in concrete achievements.

Climate Action in the United States and China (Chinese)

This pamphlet sets the context and summarizes the actions taken by the United States and China to address the threat of global climate change. The purpose is not to judge the actions of one country against the other but to help each country understand the existing activities and accomplishments of the other as a foundation for dialogue. It does not attempt to provide a comprehensive source of information about activities in each country but instead highlights activities that have resulted in concrete achievements.

Hong Kong Conference Report: Section 1 (English)

The three talks presented here opened the two-day Green NGO and Environmental Journalist Forum in Hong Kong. These talks presented an overview of green NGO development in Hong Kong, Mainland China, and Taiwan and painted pictures of three diverse environmental movements. Since these movements developed independently in different political and social environments it is not surprising that there are marked variations in the character and scope of environmental NGO activities in each area.

Hong Kong Conference Report: Sections 2-4 (English)

Section II: NGO Networking and Partnering

  • Networking and Partnering Strategies of NGOs in Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong
  • The Green Citizen Action Alliance and the Anti-Nuclear Movement in Taiwan
  • Building Local Partnerships: the South-North Institute for Sustainable Development
  • The Changing Style of Environmental NGOs in Hong Kong

Section III: NGO Environmental Education Methods

Hong Kong Conference Report: Section 4 (English)

The second day of the Green NGO and Environmental Journalist Forum, the participants focused on NGO capacity building and NGO-journalist communication. Section 4 (continued).

Section IV: Green NGO Capactiy Building

Small-Group Discussions: Member Management, Public Mobilization, and Fundraising

The Organizational Model of the Wild Bird Federation Taiwan

Hong Kong Conference Report: Section 5 (English)

Environmental journalism has flourished in China over the past decade. Hundreds of reporters produced thousands of news stories and television documentaries covering subjects from the looming shortage of water resources to the endangered species in the wilderness. In Hong Kong and Taiwan, environmental reporting also has come a long way. Working closely with nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), environmental reporters have helped forge not only an environmental consciousness, but also a political activism that pressures the Hong Kong and Taiwanese governments for change.

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