China Environment | Wilson Center

China Environment

Potential for Fuel Cell Commercialization in Taiwan (2004)

Chi-Chao Wan (Tsing-Hua University in Taiwan) and Robert Rose (Breakthrough Technologies, Inc.) wrote this paper, "Potential for Fuel Cell Commercialization in Taiwan," as part of a U.S.-Taiwan Fuel Cell Initiative that the Woodrow Wilson Center's China Environment Forum and Breakthrough Technologies, Inc. carried out in the fall of 2004 with support from the Blue Moon Fund . Jennifer L.

Animal Investigators: Solving Wildlife Crimes and Saving Endangered Species in Brazil and China

Illegal wildlife trafficking is the third largest criminal industry worldwide—after drugs and the sex trade—involving $20 billion in global trade each year. Illegal wildlife traffickers are difficult to track down as they are employing increasingly sophisticated methods, showing higher levels of organization and technological savvy. Simultaneously, the resources devoted to halting wildlife trafficking are extremely limited, due in part to other issues—such as terrorism and climate change—dominating the international dialogue.

Dire Strait? Energy Security in the Strait of Malacca

An Asia Program Event, cosponsored by the Wilson Center's Division of International Security Studies and Environmental Change and Security Program; Georgetown University's Center for Peace and Security Studies; and the U.S. Army's Dwight D. Eisenhower National Security Series.

The Road to Copenhagen: Perspectives on Brazil, China and India

A lone ranger mindset inflicting both developed and developing countries stands in the way of a significant reduction of carbons emissions, but the world will eventually have to put differences aside in order to reach an agreement on climate change, according to a panel with experts on Brazil, China, and India who convened in anticipation of the upcoming UN Convention in Copenhagen.

Here Comes the Sun (and the Wind, Water, and Biogas): Opportunities and Challenges for U.S.-China Renewable Energy Collaboration

As the world's two largest economies, it is not surprising that the United States and China are the top two energy consumers and investors in clean energy development—although in 2009 China invested twice as much as the United States. Both countries have similarly strong motivation to promote renewable energy, namely diversifying energy portfolios, creating jobs, strengthening energy security, and reducing pollution.

Complex Connections: Ecological Impacts of Chinese Investment in Southeast Asia

As the world's factory, it should not be surprising that China has had to expand its search for raw resources well beyond its borders. Over the past few years China has become a major global investor into resource extraction industries—oil, gas, minerals, timber, and agricultural products. A major catalyst for this investment is China's Export-Import Bank lending, which reached $174.2 billion in 2009 alone, nearly four times what the World Bank lent in the same year.

Asia's Growing Crisis of Floods and Droughts

The Greater Himalayas, whose glaciers supply crucial seasonal water flows to some 40 percent of the world's population, are a climate change hot spot. The Tibetan Plateau has experienced a 1 degree Celsius temperature rise in the past decade alone and the 40,000+ glaciers in these mountains are in rapid retreat, posing grave environmental and human health threats. The prospect of catastrophic changes in normal season flows (sometimes too much, and at others times too little) from this Tibetan "water tower" is real.

Taking Stock of Carbon Emissions: Policies, Strategies, and Tools for the U.S. and China

Over the past year, the Chinese government has been aggressively promoting low carbon policies to help ensure China's energy security and lower the country's greenhouse gas emissions. At the Copenhagen climate meeting in December 2009, the Chinese leadership committed the country to ambitious CO2 emissions targets.

U.S.-China Partnership for Climate Action

The Obama-Hu energy agreements in November 2009 and the Copenhagen climate talks reinvigorated discussions on the need for the United States and China to collaborate on energy and climate issues, but translating that enthusiasm into concrete projects can be elusive.

Hidden Waters, Dragons in the Deep

In the southwest corner of China, a region of towering mountains, deep gorges, and scattered villages not far from the border of Vietnam is Shidong, the Rock Cave. It is here, 800 miles west of Hong Kong and the Pacific coast, in an area so remote that people typically settle in villages not larger than 300 residents, where the Yang Liu River disappears underground.

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