China Environment

Book Launch:The River Runs Black: The Environmental Challenge to China's Future

While the China Environment Forum has since 1997 held meetings and produced articles highlighting the myriad domestic and international efforts to resolve China's acute pollution and energy problems, few books have taken a comprehensive look at the historical and current causes of China's growing environmental crisis.

Environmental Equity in China

The Great Proletariat Revolution, which led to the founding of the People's Republic of China in 1949, was designed to rid the country of inequities that existed for over 2,000 years of dynastic rule. Mao Zedong envisioned building a strong, egalitarian utopia to benefit the country's downtrodden peasants and workers.

A Roundtable Discussion with SEPA Minister Xie Zhenhua

To be heard among a sea of voices advocating economic development before ecological concerns, environmental activists and academics in China generally must be hardworking and possess dynamic personalities. Dynamism and commitment to protecting the environment also is increasingly evident in some officials of China's State Environmental Protection Administration (SEPA)—most notably in SEPA's minister Xie Zhenhua. Minister Xie sparked a candid and lively discussion at a December 9th meeting of the China Environment Forum.

Challenges for Financing Environmental Infrastructure in China


Presentations by the China Environment Forum's Municipal Finance Study Group, made possible by a grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Investment in Basic Environmental Protection Infrastructure in China

Harnessing the Waters: Nature Conquest in China's Past and Present

Perhaps no other issue in China today receives more news media attention than construction of the Three Gorges Dam. On billboards and in state-run media, the Chinese government trumpets the dam as a sign of the country's ability to achieve advanced engineering feats on par with the West; while concerned scientists, scholars, and activists around the world condemn the project as an ecological and social catastrophe. On 1 June 2003, the dam's reservoir officially began to take water.

Going Global: Chinese Oil and Mining Companies and the Governance of Resource Wealth

This report by Senior Scholar Jill Shankleman was drawn from her six-month research project at the Center examining the impact of China's oil and mining companies' overseas expansion on the governance of resource wealth.

Choke Point: Confronting Energy Demand and Water Scarcity in China

China's soaring economy, fueled by an unyielding appetite for coal, is threatened by the country's steadily diminishing freshwater reserves. Even as China has launched enormous new programs of solar, wind, hydro, and nuclear power development, which tend to use much less water and generate much less carbon, energy demand will skyrocket and will primarily rely on supplies of coal, the source of 70 percent of the nation's energy.

China Environment Series 11(2010/2011)

China's success in promoting clean energy technology has been a hot story over the past year as the China Environment Forum team pulled together this special Energy and Climate issue of the China Environment Series. We ambitiously aimed to create; and hope our readers think we succeeded;in creating an issue that takes a snapshot of major energy trends in China and understand some of the complexities in the U.S.-China energy and climate relations.

Daily Headlines: November 2010

China's environmental problems and the linkages to human health are increasingly making the news internationally. Most striking has been the growing number of reports from Chinese journalists on pollution and related health threats even after some government restrictions were put in place in late 2005 to limit reporting on sensitive pollution accidents.

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