China Environment

CEF Director Jennifer Turner Quoted in Xinhua News on Recent U.S.-China Commitments to November 2014 Climate Agreement

Commitments from China and the United States, the world's two largest economies, injected fresh energy into the battle against climate change, while bolstering prospects for an ambitious pact in Paris later this year, environmental experts said.

China Announces Cap and Trade Program

China Environment Forum Director, Jennifer Turner, comments on China’s “cap and trade program” announcement.

Jennifer Turner has been the director of the China Environment Forum at the Woodrow Wilson Center for 13 years. She has created meetings, exchanges and publications focusing on a variety of energy and environmental challenges facing China, particularly on water, energy and climate challenges, as well as environmental nongovernmental organizations, environmental journalism, and environmental governance in China.
 

CEF Director Jennifer Turner Quoted in U.S. News & World Report Article on China's Commitment to Reducing Carbon Emissions

Chinese President Xi Jinping’s state visit to the White House on Thursday may seem like just another in a long line of general diplomatic meetings where much is discussed but little is resolved​​​​​​​​​​​. But behind closed doors the Obama administration has built a stable diplomatic relationship with China that shows no signs of collapsing, experts say, even as the discussion between the two superpowers becomes increasingly blunt.

COAL: China's laws not winning the climate and pollution 'war,' experts say

China is entering a new era of energy and environmental laws aimed at clearing the air while ratcheting down carbon pollution, experts said yesterday.

Speaking at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, policy analysts and environmental activists working on Chinese energy issues praised a new air pollution law aimed at restricting various forms of smog. But, they argued, while China is increasingly serious about tackling the twin challenges of climate change and air pollution, the government needs still more tools to restrict the growth of coal.

Can Algae Impact Climate Change?

Dr. Brian Walsh discusses his new paper, New Feed Sources Key to Ambitious Climate Targets, which finds replacing microalgae as animal feed could free up significant land currently used for pasture and feed crops, while meeting 50 percent of our annual energy needs and potentially reducing global atmospheric carbon concentrations to preindustrial levels by the end of the century.

Tracking the Energy Titans: Hidden Trends in the United States, China, and Canada [Infographic]

Back in high school physics we learned the first law of thermodynamics: Energy within a closed system must remain constant. In other words, the total amount of energy cannot increase or decrease without some sort of outside interference.

New Partnerships for Clearing the Air in Asia’s Cities

Asian cities are at the frontlines in the fight against air pollution. These cities are engines of economic growth, but often lack the tools and capacity they need to better manage air quality. Jane Nishida (U.S. EPA) and Wei Kuo-yen (EPA Taiwan) will provide examples of how their jointly created International Environmental Partnership (IEP) initiative has promoted the transfer of best practices to help cities in Asia clear their air. Wei Kuo-yen will highlight some examples from Taiwanese cities lowering their PM2.5 emissions.

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