Climate | Wilson Center

Climate

How Low (on Energy and Carbon) Can Buildings in China and the U.S. Go?

Cities consume 70% of global energy, with building construction and operation creating the largest energy footprint. Buildings are energy hungry in both the United States and China, using 40% and 20% of urban energy, respectively. In the United States and China, the real estate and construction sectors generate 40% of each country’s carbon emissions.

Can We Price Carbon?

A political science analysis of the feasibility and sustainability of carbon pricing, drawing from North American, European, and Asian case studies.

Book Launch: Can We Price Carbon?

Join us on Tuesday, April 24th from 3:00 - 4:00PM for a book launch discussion with author Barry Rabe on pricing carbon. Climate change, economists generally agree, is best addressed by putting a price on the carbon content of fossil fuels—by taxing carbon, by cap-and-trade systems, or other methods. But what about the politics of carbon pricing? Do political realities render carbon pricing impracticable?

Amazon Tipping Point

In the 1970s, Brazilian scientist Eneas Salati shattered the long held dogma that vegetation is simply the consequence of climate and has no influence on climate whatsoever (1).

Pages