Climate

The Conflict Potential of Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation: Backdraft Revisited

Whether or not we respond to climate change – and the security implications of that decision – is a major public policy question. But increasingly experts are paying closer attention to how we respond.

Preparing the National Climate Assessment: An Opportunity to Engage

In 1990, the U.S. Congress passed the Global Change Research Act “to assist the Nation and the world to understand, assess, predict, and respond to human-induced and natural processes of global change.” Under this mandate, the U.S.

Justice and Contemporary Climate Relocation: An Addendum to Words of Caution on “Climate Refugees”

This article first appeared on ECSP’s blog, New Security Beat.

The idea that climate change is causing migration and displacement is entering the mainstream, but experts have warned against using the term “climate refugees” to describe what we’re seeing in small islands, coastal regions, and even conflict zones like Syria.

Canada’s Carbon Policies Try to Provide Something for Everyone

Climate Change and Migration

Island nations are on the frontlines of adapting to changes resulting from climate change even though they barely contribute to the warming of the planet. And while the world has been focused on migration issues related to the conflict in Syria, climate change disruptions are a growing source of the movement of people that often flies under the radar. Maxine Burkett, an expert in climate change policy and the law, explains the evolving situation in this edition of  Wilson Center NOW.

Guest

UNEP's GEO-6 North American Report: Informing the 2030 Development Agenda

With so much focus on global environmental problems, many may wonder how their region is faring more specifically. This is the sentiment behind the United Nations Environment Program’s process for the latest iteration of its flagship assessment, the Global Environmental Outlook 6 (GEO-6). 

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