Cold War | Wilson Center

Cold War

A New Socialist Hungary? Remembering the Defeat of the Hungarian Revolution 63 Years Later

Materials contained within the 1956 Polish and Hungarian Crises collection on DigitalArchive.org highlight the contrast between Prime Minister Imre Nagy’s diplomatic efforts to rebrand Hungary as a people’s democracy and the Soviet Union’s desire to vanquish what they saw as an assault on international Communism.

Imre Nagy, a New Hungary

Antarctic Arms Control at 60: A Precedent or a Pole Apart?

The Collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe: A 30-Year Legacy

This conference will explore the events leading to and influencing the collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe in the Autumn of 1989. A panel comprised of former officers from the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and scholars will discuss the ways in which analysis from the time informed policymakers, assisting them in formulating the US policies and response to Communism’s collapse in the region.

NATO: Past and Present

In 2019 NATO marks the seventieth anniversary of its founding. Created as a bulwark against perceived Soviet expansionism, NATO became a fixture of the European security landscape, one that anchored the United States in Europe and formed the institutional framework for political and military cooperation between Washington and its Western European allies. NATO helped keep Western Europe secure, democratic, and prosperous through the Cold War years. The end of the Cold War presented the Transatlantic alliance with a new set of challenges.

Fearing the Worst: How Korea Transformed the Cold War

After World War II, the escalating tensions of the Cold War shaped the international system. Fearing the Worst explains how the Korean War fundamentally changed postwar competition between the United States and the Soviet Union into a militarized confrontation that would last decades.

Fearing the Worst: How Korea Transformed the Cold War

After World War II, the escalating tensions of the Cold War shaped the international system. Fearing the Worst: How Korea Transformed the Cold War explains how the Korean War fundamentally changed postwar competition between the United States and the Soviet Union into a militarized confrontation that would last decades.

Germany 30 Years After the Fall of the Berlin Wall

In this edition of Wilson Center NOW we speak with author Hope M. Harrison about her new book, After the Berlin Wall: Memory and the Making of the New Germany, 1989 to the Present. Drawing on an extensive range of archival sources and interviews, the book profiles German citizens who have fought to commemorate the history of the Berlin Wall and examines their roles in the creation of a new German national narrative for the 21st Century.
 
Guest

From Mao to Deng: China’s Changing Relations with the United States

To download this Working Paper, please click here.

CWIHP Working Paper 92

From Mao to Deng: China’s Changing Relations with the United States

Chen Jian
November 2019

 

Firebird: The Elusive Fate of Russian Democracy

Andrei Kozyrev was foreign minister of Russia under President Boris Yeltsin from August 1991 to January 1996. During the August 1991 coup attempt against Mikhail Gorbachev, he was present when tanks moved in to seize the Russian White House, where Boris Yeltsin famously stood on a tank to address the crowd assembled. He then departed to Paris to muster international support and, if needed, to form a Russian government-in-exile.

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