Cold War

Atomizing Iran: Eisenhower and the Bomb

“The gravity of the time is such that every new avenue of peace, no matter how dimly discernible, should be explored.”

—Dwight D. Eisenhower, Address to the UN General Assembly, December 8, 1953

 

Central Asia and the Global Cold War

A View from Russian and Tajikistani Archives

 

On May, 1, 1960, Francis Gary Powers took off in a U-2 spy plane from an airbase in Pakistan, flew over Afghanistan and into Soviet airspace, where he proceeded to photograph industrial and military installations before being shot down near Cheliabinsk, in Siberia.

Declassified Documents Shed Light on Long, Complicated Negotiations over Korean Armistice Agreement

On 12 June, 2018, after months of trading threats and fiery rhetoric, US President Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un of North Korea backed off from the precipice of war and held a historic summit in Singapore, the first high-level meeting between the leaders of the Korean War foes.

A Deep Dive on Nuclear History in the Hills of Italy

This past June, 16 students gathered in the hills of northern Italy for a ten-day deep immersion on perhaps the most monumental scientific innovation of the last 100 years: nuclear technology. Now in its 8th year, the Nuclear History Boot Camp is an initiative of the Nuclear Proliferation International History Project (NPIHP) in conjunction with the University of Roma Tre and the Machiavelli Center for Cold War Studies, and is funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

Another Summit Meeting in Helsinki: Bush/Gorbachev

In early September 1990, George H.W. Bush and Mikhail Gorbachev met in Helsinki. There was much on their respective plates: Saddam Hussein’s invasion of Kuwait, the prospect of German unification, and the perennial challenges of arms control. Like this July’s summit meeting in Helsinki, both men sought to renew a spirit of collaboration.

Beyond "The Architect"

Accounts of US foreign policymaking in the years of Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford’s presidencies rightly emphasize the centrality of Henry Kissinger.  Yet, my research on the intersection of policy formulation and human rights activism in these years suggests the history is more complicated, with several of Kissinger’s chief aides repeatedly pressing for more US attention to and action on international human rights violations.

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