Cold War | Wilson Center

Cold War

From Alignment to Non-Alignment: Yugoslavia Discovers the Third World

Yugoslavia set the pace of political developments inside the Non-Aligned Movement and around the Third World during the Cold War era. And unlike other non-aligned countries during this period, Yugoslavia’s non-alignment was neither a product of anti-colonial revolution nor of post-colonial defiance to former masters.

Dr. Hope M. Harrison: 30th Anniversary of the Fall of the Berlin Wall

Dr. Hope Harrison was a Public Policy Fellow with the History and Public Policy Program as well as the Cold War International History Project at the Wilson Center in Washington, D.C. from June 2014 to October 2016. She is an Associate Professor of History & International Affairs at George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs. Her focuses are on the Berlin Wall, Germany, international history of the Cold War, and Russian foreign policy. She is also the author of the award-winning book Driving the Soviets up the Wall (Princeton Univ. Press, 2003).

“An Explosion Occurred in Power Unit No. 4”: The Story of Chernobyl in Documents

Image: The first photograph of Unit Four after the accident, shot from a helicopter by Chernobyl plant photographer Anatoly Rasskazov, at approximately 3.00pm on April 26 1986 (Anatoly Rasskazov/Ukrainian National Chernobyl Museum).

Dr. Jamil Hasanli: Leadership and Nationalism in Azerbaijan

Dr. Jamil Hasanli is an Azerbaijani historian, author, and politician. He was a History and Public Policy Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson Center in 2011, and also the 2015 recipient of the Ion Ratiu Democracy Award. He served two terms as a member of the Azeri Parliament from 2000-2010. Dr. Hasanli was a professor at Baku State University from 1993 to 2011 and Khazar University from 2011 to 2013.
 

Q&A

The Non-Aligned Movement and the North-South Conflict

The history of decolonization, of South-South cooperation, of the Global Cold War, and of the North-South conflict cannot be grasped without understanding the crucial impact and changing fate of the Non-Alignment Movement.

Despite opposition from the former European colonial powers and the superpowers of the East-West conflict, governments from nearly all Asian, African, and Latin American countries—with very different political and economic systems—still  banded together in the Non-Aligned Movement.

North Korea Revelations from the Polish Archives: Nukes, Succession and, Security

Communist-ruled Poland was one of the first states to recognize the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) in 1948. Less than two years later, Poland (together with other countries from the Eastern Bloc) joined the Korean War effort by assisting the DPRK and spreading anti-American propaganda domestically. After the war, Poland supported the reconstruction of North Korea and received 1,200 orphans as well as a considerable number of students.

US-Iran Relations: The Scowcroft Transcripts

The Shah of Iran was once memorably described by Henry Kissinger as “that rarest of leaders, an unconditional ally, and one whose understanding of the world enhanced our own.”[1] After he left office, Kissinger aggressively promoted the view that US-Iran relations had been trouble-free and mutually beneficial until the 1979 revolution, which he blamed on the Carter administration.

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