Cold War | Wilson Center

Cold War

The Kremlinologist: Llewellyn E. Thompson, America's Man in Cold-War Moscow

In The Kremlinologist, diplomat Llewellyn E. Thompson’s daughters, Jenny and Sherry Thompson, trace their father’s journey from boyhood in rural Colorado and New Mexico to U.S. ambassador to the USSR to presidential advisor on Soviet Affairs.

South Korea’s First Major Sporting Event—and Why It Never Took Place

North Korean military provocations derailed Seoul’s plans to host the 1970 Asian Games

Sporting events on the Korean Peninsula have a tendency to become highly political.

Most recently, the PyeongChang Winter Olympics allowed South Korea and North Korea to calm tensions on the peninsula and to deliberate over a possible reunification sometime in the future. Simultaneously, the Games served to illustrate South Korea’s respectable position within the international community and North Korea’s status as an outsider.

Drunk and Disorderly: Vladimir Petrov's Queensland Escapade

Vladimir Petrov and Evdokia Petrov inside the safe house in which they were held following their defection to Australia in 1954.

In the run-up to the 1956 Olympic Games, Australia’s security agency, ASIO, expected that the KGB would infiltrate the event

Grace Kennan Warnecke: “Daughter of the Cold War”

Grace Kennan Warnecke discusses her soon-to-be-published memoir about life, career, and what it was like growing up as the daughter of George F. Kennan, one of the most influential diplomats and foreign policy thinkers of the twentieth century. She shares her memories and insights during this episode of Wilson Center NOW.

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Vietnam: The Kissinger-Le Duc Tho Negotiations, August 1969-December 1973

Vietnam: The Kissinger-Le Duc Tho Negotiations, August 1969-December 1973, an almost 1,800 page documentary history of the negotiations, compiled and edited by John M. Carland, contains word searchable transcripts of every meeting Kissinger had with the North Vietnamese—comprised of 68 separate meetings in 27 separate negotiating rounds. The negotiations resulted in the still controversial January 1973 Paris Peace Accords.

Demolition on Karl Marx Square: Cultural Barbarism and the People’s State in 1968

It has been presumed that East Germans were passive after their failed 1953 Uprising. More recent scholarship has even claimed that they enjoyed a People’s State, in which Communist leaders sought to satisfy their everyday needs.

The Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty and the German Nuclear Question Part 1, 1954-1964

This posting is part of a series of document collections co-published by the National Security Archive and the Nuclear Proliferation International History Project to mark the 50th anniversary of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

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