Cold War | Wilson Center

Cold War

<b>Live Webcast/Book Discussion:</b> <i>Kim Il Sung in the Khrushchev Era</i>

To watch the live webcast, follow the links in the See Also box to the right of this screen.

6th Floor Boardroom
Woodrow Wilson Center
1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Washington, DC 20004

with
Balasz Szalontai, Department of Political Science, National University of Mongolia
James Hershberg, George Washington University
Hyung-ki Kim, Kyungnam University
Kathryn Weathersby, Cold War International History Project

<b>Live Webcast:</b> Reconsidering the Cold War

To watch the video of this event, follow the links in the See Also box to the right of this screen.

<b>Live Webcast/Book Discussion:</b> <i>Mitterrand, the End of the Cold War, and German Unification: From Yalta to Maastricht</i>

To watch the video of this event, please follow the links in the See Also box to the right of this screen.

Book Discussion - <i>Racing the Enemy: Stalin, Truman, and the Surrender of Japan</i>

5th Floor Conference Room
Woodrow Wilson Center
1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Washington, DC 20004

with
Tsuyoshi Hasegawa, University of California, Santa Barbara
Robert L. Beisner, American University, emeritus
Hope Harrison, George Washington University

Book Discussion: <i>Louis Johnson and the Arming of America</i>

6th Floor Boardroom
Woodrow Wilson Center
1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Washington, DC 20004

with David L. Roll, Partner, Steptoe & Johnson LLP

North Korea Since 2000 and Prospects for Inter-Korean Relations

To watch video of this event, please follow the link in the See Also box to the right of this screen.

Book Discussion: Assuming the Burden: Europe and the American Commitment to War in Vietnam

6th Floor Boardroom
Woodrow Wilson Center
1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Washington, DC 20004

Mark Lawrence, University of Texas at Austin

Film Screening: <i>Between the Lines</i>

Since the first brick was laid to build the Berlin Wall in 1961, hundreds of East Germans lost their lives in search of political freedom and economic prosperity at the border. For East German politicians, the escapees were mere criminals attempting to disrupt a nation's will to "protect" its boundaries. In contrast, in West Germany, every escapee was a survivor who left behind a political regime which imprisoned its people behind concrete walls and psychological fences.

<b>Live Webcast</b>--Denmark in the Cold War: National Security Policy and the International Environment, 1945-1991.

6th Floor Boardroom
Woodrow Wilson Center
1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Washington, DC 20004

To watch the live webcast, follow the links in the See Also box to the right of this screen.


co-sponsored by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark, the Wilson Center's Western European Studies Program, and the Danish Institute for International Studies (DIIS)

with
Svend Åge Christensen - Senior Research Fellow, Cold War Studies, DIIS

<b>Live Webcast:</b> Congress and the Cold War

To watch the live webcast, follow the links in the See Also box to the right of this screen.

5th Floor Conference Room
Woodrow Wilson Center
1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Washington, DC 20004

Robert David (KC) Johnson, Brooklyn College, City University of New York
David M. Barrett, Villanova University

with commentators:
Congressman John B. Anderson, Professor of Law at Nova Southeastern University and Chair of the Center for Voting and Democracy
Walter Pincus, The Washington Post

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